Etymology
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cramp (v.1)

"to contract, afflict with spasms" (of muscles), early 15c., from cramp (n.1). Related: Cramped; cramping.

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obligee (n.)

in law, "person to whom another is bound by contract," 1570s, from oblige + -ee.

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obligor (n.)
"person who binds himself to another by contract," 1540s, agent noun in Latin form from oblige.
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infringement (n.)
"a break or breach" (of a contract, right, etc.), from infringe + -ment. Earlier in a now-obsolete sense of "contradiction" (1590s).
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delegate (v.)

"to send with power to transact business as a representative," 1520s, from past-participle stem of Latin delegare "to send as a representative," from de "from, away" (see de-) + legare "send with a commission," possibly literally "engage by contract" and related to lex (genitive legis) "contract, law," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." Related: Delegated; delegating.

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covenant (v.)

"to enter into a formal agreement or contract," c. 1300, from covenant (n.). Related: Covenanted; covenanting. Also see covenanter.

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defibrillation (n.)

"stopping of fibrillation," by 1936; by 1940 specifically in reference to heartbeat, from de- + fibrillation "a beating in an abnormal way," especially of the muscles of the heart that contract irregularly in this condition.

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charter (v.)

early 15c., "provide with a charter," from charter (n.). Meaning "to hire by special contract" is attested from 1806. Related: Chartered; chartering.

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renegotiate (v.)

also re-negotiate, "negotiate (a contract, treaty, etc.) again or anew," 1844, from re- "again" + negotiate (v.). Related: Renegotiated; renegotiating; renegotiation.

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outsource (v.)

"obtain goods or a service from an outside or foreign supplier; contract work to an outside entity," especially in reference to work and jobs going overseas, by 1981 (implied in outsourcing), from out- + source (v.). Related: Outsourced.

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