Etymology
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pancratium (n.)

in ancient Greece, a contest combining wrestling and boxing, c. 1600, from Latinized form of Greek pankration, literally "complete contest," from pan- "all" (see pan-) + kratos "strength," from PIE *kre-tes- "power, strength," suffixed form of root *kar- "hard."  

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pentathlon (n.)

"athletic contest of five separate events involving the same competitors and all taking place on the same day," 1650s, from Greek pentathlon "the contest of five exercises," from pente "five" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + athlon "prize, contest," a word of uncertain origin. Earlier in English in Latin form pentathlum (1706). The Greek version consisted of jumping, sprinting, discus and spear throwing, and wrestling. The modern version (1912) consists of horseback riding, fencing, shooting, swimming, and cross-country running. Related: Pentathlete.

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frisson (n.)
"emotional thrill," 1777 (Walpole), from French frisson "fever, illness; shiver, thrill" (12c.), from Latin frigere "to be cold" (see frigid). Scant record of the word in English between Walpole's use and 1888.
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tug (n.)
mid-14c., in reference to some part of a harness;" c. 1500 as "act of pulling or dragging," from tug (v.). Meaning "small, powerful vessel for towing other vessels" is recorded from 1817. Phrase tug of war (1670s) was originally figurative, "the decisive contest, the real struggle," from the noun in the sense "supreme effort, strenuous contest of forces" (1650s). As an actual athletic event, from 1876.
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contested (adj.)

"disputed, made the object of contention or competition," 1670s, past-participle adjective from contest (v.). Specifically of elections from 1771, American English.

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terminal (adj.)
mid-15c., "relating to or marking boundaries," from Latin terminalis "pertaining to a boundary or end, final," from terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus). Meaning "fatal" (terminal illness) is first recorded 1891. Sense of "situated at the extreme end" (of something) is from 1805. Slang meaning "extreme" first recorded 1983. Related: Termninally.
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defeat (n.)
Origin and meaning of defeat

1590s, "an undoing, ruin," from defeat (v.). From c. 1600 as "act of overcoming in a military contest;" by 1690s of other contests and struggles.

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entrant (n.)
1630s, "one who enters, a beginner" (of professions, etc.); from French entrant, present participle of entrer (see enter). From 1838 with reference to one who enters a contest. As an adjective from 1630s.
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coach (v.)

1610s, "to convey in a coach," from coach (n.). Meaning "to tutor, give private instruction to, prepare (someone) for an exam or a contest" is from 1849. Related: Coached; coaching.

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cross-examine (n.)

"examine a witness (by the other side) to 'check' the effects of previous questioning," 1660s, from cross (adv.) in the sense "proceeding from an adverse party by way of reciprocal contest" + examine. Related: Cross-examination (1746).

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