Etymology
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idealize (v.)

1786, "make ideal, consider as ideal," probably formed from ideal (adj.) + -ize. Related: Idealized; idealizing.

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advise (v.)

late 13c., avisen "to view, consider" (a sense now obsolete); late 14c., "to give counsel to," from Old French aviser "deliberate, reflect, consider" (13c.), from avis "opinion," from phrase ço m'est à vis "it seems to me," or from Vulgar Latin *mi est visum "in my view," ultimately from Latin visum, neuter past participle of videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). The unetymological -d- is from 16c. Related: Advised; advising.

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respite (v.)

early 14c., respiten, "reprieve from death;" late 14c., "refrain from action, desist; grant (someone) an extension of time," from Old French respitier, respiter, from Latin respicere "look back at, regard, consider" (see respite (n.)), or else from Latin respectare "consider, respect," in Medieval Latin "delay, postpone" [Century Dictionary]. Related: Respited; respiting.

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prepend (v.)

"ponder, consider," 1560s, from pre- "before" + Latin pendere "to hang, cause to hang; weigh; pay" (from PIE root *(s)pen- "to draw, stretch, spin"). Related: Prepended; prepending.

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inconsideration (n.)

1520s, "indiscretion, rashness, failure to consider," from Late Latin inconsiderationem (nominative inconsideratio) "inconsiderateness," from Latin inconsideratus "headstrong, thoughtless" (see inconsiderate).

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equal (v.)

1580s, "compare, liken, consider as equal" (obsolete), also "match, rival, become equal to," from equal (adj.). Related: Equaled; equaling.

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contemn (v.)

mid-15c., contempnen, "to slight or spurn," from Old French contemner (15c.) or directly from Latin contemnere "to despise, scorn, consider (something or someone) as of small value," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + *temnere "to slight, scorn," which is of uncertain origin (see contempt). Of laws, agreements, etc., "consider and treat as contemptible," 1570s. Related: Contemned; contemning.

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disesteem (v.)

"consider with disregard or slight contempt," 1590s, from dis- + esteem (v.). Perhaps modeled on Old French desestimer. Related: Disesteemed; disesteeming; disestimation.

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rethink (v.)

also re-think, 1700, "to think again (about something), consider afresh," from re- "back, again" + think (v.). Intransitive sense is by 1748. Related: Rethinking.

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forethought (n.)

early 14c., "a thinking beforehand, the act of planning," verbal noun from forethink "think of something beforehand," from Old English foreþencan "to premeditate, consider;" see fore- + think. Meaning "prudence, provident care" is from 1719.

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