Etymology
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acquiescence (n.)

1630s, "rest, quiet, satisfaction," from French acquiescence, noun of action from acquiescer "to yield or agree to; be at rest" (see acquiesce). Meaning "silent consent, passive assent" is recorded from 1640s.

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decline (v.)

late 14c., "to turn aside, deviate" (a sense now archaic), also "sink to a lower level," and, figuratively, "fall to an inferior or impaired condition," from Old French decliner "to sink, decline, degenerate, turn aside," from Latin declinare "to lower; avoid, deviate; bend from, inflect," from de "from" (see de-) + clinare "to bend" (from PIE *klein-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean").

In grammar, "to inflect as a noun or adjective," from late 14c. The sense has been altered by interpretation of de- as "downward;" intransitive meaning "to bend or slant down" is from c. 1400. Sense of "not to consent, politely refuse or withhold consent to do" is from 1630s. Related: Declined; declining.

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concent (n.)

"harmony, concord of sounds," 1580s, from Latin concentus "a singing together, harmony," from concinere "to sing or sound together," from con- "with, together" (see con-) + canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). Often misspelled consent or confused with that word.

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grantor (n.)

in legal language, "person who makes a grant or conveyance," 1620s, from Anglo-French grantor, Old French graanter agent noun from granter "give; agree, consent; admit; permit" (see grant (v.)). Native form granter (n.) is attested from c. 1400.

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non-consensual (adj.)

also nonconsensual, "done without consent," by 1945 in legalese, from non- + consensual (q.v.). Used since 1960s by sociologists and in political science; used by 1977 in legal discussions and definitions of rape and other sex crimes and popularized in this sense from c. 1995. An earlier adjective was non-consenting (1670s), which was used of persons, not acts.

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gang-bang (n.)

1953, "group sex" (especially many men on one woman or girl, regardless of consent), from gang + bang (v.) in its slang, "perform sexual intercourse" sense. Earlier was gang-shag (1927). Sense of "participate in a street gang" is by 1968. Related: Gang-banger; gang-banging.

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courtship (n.)

1570s, "behavior of a courtier," from court (n.) + -ship. Meaning "the wooing of a woman, attention paid by a man to a woman with intention of winning her affection and ultimately her consent to marriage" is from 1590s. By 1830s it was used of a period during which a couple mutually develops a romantic relationship with a view to marriage.

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agreeable (adj.)

late 14c., of things, "to one's liking, pleasant, satisfactory, suitable," from Old French agreable "pleasing; in agreement; consenting" (12c., Modern French agréable), from agreer "to satisfy; to take pleasure in" (see agree). Of persons, "willing or ready to consent," mid-15c. Related: Agreeably; agreeability; agreeableness. To do the agreeable (1825) was to "act in a courteous manner."

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condescend (v.)

mid-14c., of God, a king., etc., "make gracious allowance" for human frailty, etc.; late 14c., "yield deferentially," from Old French condescendere (14c.) "to agree, consent, give in, yield, come down from one's rights or claims," and directly from Late Latin condescendere "to let oneself down, stoop," in Medieval Latin "be complaisant or compliant," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see con-) + descendere "to descend," literally "climb down," from de "down" (see de-) + scandere "to climb," from PIE root *skand- "jump" (see scan (v.)).

Sense of ""voluntarily waive ceremony or dignity proper to one's superior position or rank and willingly assume equality with inferiors" is from early 15c. Generally a positive word in Middle English; the modern, negative sense is from the notion of a mere show or assumed air of condescending (compare sense evolution in patronize). Also in Middle English "give one's consent; come to mutual agreement; make a concession."

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dissent (v.)

mid-15c., dissenten, "express a different or contrary opinion or feeling, withhold approval or consent," from Old French dissentir (15c.) and directly from Latin dissentire "differ in sentiments, disagree, be at odds, contradict, quarrel," from dis- "differently" (see dis-) + sentire "to feel, think" (see sense (n.)). Ecclesiastical sense of "refuse to be bound by the doctrines or rules of an established church" is from 1550s. Related: Dissented; dissenting.

The noun is 1580s, "difference of opinion with regard to religious doctrine or worship," from the verb. From 1650s as "the act of dissenting, refusal to be bound by what is contrary to one's own judgment" (the opposite of consent). From 1660s as "a declaration of disagreement." By 1772 in the specific sense of "refusal to conform to an established church." 

Has there ever been a society which has died of dissent? Several have died of conformity in our lifetime. [Jacob Bronowski "Science and Human Values," 1956]
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