Etymology
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synapsis (n.)

plural synapses, 1895 in cellular biology, Modern Latin, from Greek synapsis "connection, junction" (see synapse).

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stubborn (adj.)

late 14c., of uncertain origin. Earliest form is stiborn. OED, Liberman doubt any connection with stub (n.). Related: Stubbornly; stubbornness.

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virginals (n.)

"small harpsichord," 1520s, evidently from virgin, but the connection is unclear, unless it means "an instrument played by girls."

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immediacy (n.)

c. 1600, from immediate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Middle English had immediacioun "close connection, proximity" (mid-15c.).

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yikes 

exclamation of alarm or surprise, by 1953; perhaps from yoicks, a call in fox-hunting, attested from c. 1770. Yike "a fight" is slang attested from 1940, of uncertain connection.

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dissociation (n.)

"the severance of association or connection," 1610s, from French dissociation, from Latin dissociationem (nominative dissociatio) "a separation," noun of action from past-participle stem of dissociare (see dissociate).

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improvident (adj.)

1510s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + provident. It retains a stronger connection with the "provide" aspect of Latin providere than provident now does. Related: Improvidently.

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correlation (n.)

1560s, "mutual relation, interdependence, interconnection," from French corrélation, from cor- "together" (see com-) + relation (see relation). Meaning "action of bringing into orderly connection" is by 1879.

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leet (n.1)

in reference to special court proceedings, late 13c., from Anglo-French lete, Anglo-Latin leta, of unknown origin; OED suggests possible connection to let (v.).

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bugger (v.)

"commit buggery with or on," 1590s, from bugger (n.). The meaning "ruin, spoil" is from 1923. Related: Buggered; buggering. Bugger off "go away" is from 1922, but the connection is obscure.

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