Etymology
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contubernal (n.)

"one who occupies the same tent," 1842, from Latin contubernalis "tent-companion, comrade," noun use of adjective, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + taberna "hut, tent" (see tavern).

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conterraneous (adj.)

"of the same earth or world," 1640s, from Latin conterraneus, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + terra "earth, land" (literally "dry land," from PIE root *ters- "to dry"). 

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concave (adj.)
Origin and meaning of concave

"incurved," early 15c., from Old French concave (14c.) or directly from Latin concavus "hollow, arched, vaulted, curved," from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole").

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concentric (adj.)

"having a common center," c. 1400, from Old French concentrique, from Medieval Latin concentricus, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + Latin centrum "circle, center" (see center (n.)).

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consanguine (adj.)

"descended from a common ancestor," c. 1600, from French consanguin (14c.), from Latin consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

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conterminous (adj.)

"having the same limit, touching at the boundary," 1670s, from Latin conterminus "bordering upon, having a common boundary," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + terminus "end, boundary line" (see terminus). Related: Conterminously; conterminousness.

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convolute (adj.)

"rolled up together," 1794, from Latin convolutus, past participle of convolvere "to roll together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." The noun meaning "something convoluted" is from 1846.

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conspecific (adj.)

"having the character of a conspecies, of the same species but with variations," 1837, from conspecies "a sub-species, a climatic or geographical variety of another" (1837), from con- "with" + specific, here serving as the adjective of species (n.). From 1962 as a noun.

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Connor 

masc. proper name, little used in U.S. before 1980; in the top 100 names given to boys from 1992; apparently an alteration and appropriation of the surname Conner (13c.), representing Old English cunnere "examiner, inspector" (as in ale-conner; see con (v.3)).

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confiscation (n.)

"act of appropriating as forfeit," 1540s, from French confiscation, from Latin confiscationem (nominative confiscatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of confiscare, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fiscus "public treasury" (see fiscal).

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