Etymology
Advertisement
Advertisement
spyware (n.)

"software used to obtain covert information about a computer's activities by transmitting data covertly from its hard drive to another computer," by 2000, from spy + ending from software in the computer sense.

Related entries & more 
PowerPoint (n.)
Microsoft computer slide show program, 1987.
Related entries & more 
code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

Related entries & more 
cgi 
by 2004, initialism (acronym) for computer-generated imagery.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lol (interj.)
by 1993, computer chat abbreviation of laughing out loud.
Related entries & more 
Teletex (n.)
proprietary name for a computer data-sharing network, 1978.
Related entries & more 
byte (n.)
"unit of digital information in a computer," typically consisting of eight bits, 1956, American English; see bit (n.2). Reputedly coined by German-born American computer scientist Werner Buchholz (b. 1922) at IBM.
Related entries & more 
prompt (n.)

early 15c., "readiness" (in phrase in prompte), from Latin promptus (see prompt (v.)). Meaning "hint, information suggested, act of prompting" is from 1590s. The computer sense of "message given by a computer requiring or helping the user to respond" is by 1977.

Related entries & more 
server (n.)
late 14c., agent noun from serve (v.). Computer sense by 1992.
Related entries & more 

Page 2