Etymology
Advertisement
Rube Goldberg 

1940, in reference to U.S. cartoonist Reuben Lucius Goldberg (1883-1970) who devised fantastically complex gadgetry to accomplish simple tasks. His British counterpart was Heath Robinson (1872-1944).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
inferiority (n.)

"state of being inferior," 1590s, probably from Medieval Latin *inferioritas; see inferior + -ity. Inferiority complex first attested 1919.

The surrender of life is nothing to sinking down into acknowledgment of inferiority. [John C. Calhoun, Senate debate, Feb. 19, 1847]
Related entries & more 
tryptophan (n.)

also tryptophane, complex amino acid, 1890, coined in German (1876) from trypto-, taken as a combining form of tryptic "by trypsin" (see trypsin) + Greek phainein "bring to light, cause to appear, show" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine").

Related entries & more 
simulator (n.)
1835, of persons, from Latin simulator "a copier, feigner," agent noun from simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). In reference to training devices for complex systems, from 1947 (flight simulator).
Related entries & more 
pantothenic (adj.)
denoting a B-complex vitamin acid, 1933, from Greek pantothen "from all quarters, on every side," from panto-, combining form of pantos, genitive of pan "all" (see pan-) + -ic. So called because it was found in so many sources.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
complication (n.)

early 15c., "complex combination or intricate intermingling," from Latin complicationem (nominative complicatio), noun of action from past participle stem of complicare "to fold together, fold up, roll up," from com "with, together" (see com-) + plicare "to fold, weave" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

From 1690s as "an additional disorder which develops during the course of an existing one," hence, generally, "that which renders (an existing situation) complex, involved, or intricate."

Complication commonly implies entanglement resulting either in difficulty of comprehension or in embarrassment; complexity, the multiplicity and not easily recognized relation of parts; as business complications; the complexity of a machine; the complexity of a question of duty. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
aetio- 
word-forming element used in chemistry and indicating "a fundamental degradation product of a complex organic compound" [Flood], from Latinized combining form of Greek aitia "a cause, an origin" (see etiology). In older, general use it has been reduced in English to etio- (see æ (1)).
Related entries & more 
Byzantine (adj.)
pertaining to Byzantium (q.v., original name of Constantinople, modern Istanbul), 1770, from Late Latin Byzantinus; originally used of the style of art and architecture developed there 4c.-5c. C.E.; later in reference to the complex, devious, and intriguing character of the royal court of Constantinople (1937). As a noun from 1770. Byzantian is from 1610s.
Related entries & more 
castration (n.)

"act of castrating," early 15c., castracioun, from Latin castrationem (nominative castratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of castrare "to castrate, emasculate," supposedly from a noun *castrum "knife, instrument that cuts," from PIE root *kes- "to cut." Freud's castration complex is attested from 1914 in English (translating German Kastrationsangst).

Related entries & more 
calculator (n.)

late 14c., "mathematician, one who calculates," from Latin calculator, from calculatus, past participle of calculare "to reckon, compute," from calculus "reckoning, account" (see calculus). Of mechanical adding machine contraptions, from 1784. Of electronic ones, from 1946.

Electronic calculator uses 18,000 tubes to solve complex problems [Scientific American headline, June 1946]
Related entries & more 

Page 2