Etymology
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commercialism (n.)

1849, "principles and practice of commerce," from commercial (adj.) + -ism. By 1889 as "predominance of commercial pursuits in a place or community."

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methanol (n.)
"methyl alcohol," 1892 (adopted that year by the international scientific community), from methyl + -ol, suffix denoting "alcohol."
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Soweto (n.)
black African community outside Johannesburg, South Africa, formed from first letters of South Western Townships. Related: Sowetan.
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matrilocal (adj.)

1897, from matri- + local. Applied to the custom in certain social groups for a married couple to settle in the wife's home or community.

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volunteerism (n.)
1844, with reference to armed forces; from volunteer + -ism. In reference to volunteer labor in community activities, by 1977.
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-ing (3)
Old English -ing, patronymic suffix (denoting common origin); surviving in place names (Birmingham, Nottingham) where it denotes "tribe, community."
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patrilocal (adj.)

1906, in reference to the customs of certain social groups where a married couple settles in the husband's house or community, from patri- + local (adj.).

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academia (n.)
"the academic community, the world of colleges and universities," 1956, Modern Latin, from Academe (q.v.). Related modern coinages include academize (1966); academese (1937).
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publicness (n.)

"character of common possession or interest; openness or exposure to notice or knowledge of the community or of people at large," c. 1600, from public (adj.) + -ness.

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homogeny (n.)
1620s, "uniformity of nature;" by 1856 in biological sense "descent from a common ancestor," from Greek homogeneia "community of origin," from homogene "of the same race or kind" (see homogeneous).
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