Etymology
Advertisement
bunyip (n.)

fabulous swamp-dwelling animal of Australia (supposedly inspired by fossil bones), 1848, from an Australian aborigine language.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Commie (n.)

shortening of communist (n.), 1939. Australia/New Zealand variant Commo is attested from 1941.

Related entries & more 
Speedo 

trademark name of a brand of swimwear, 1928, originally made by McRae Hosiery Manufacturers, Australia. From speed.

Related entries & more 
Australian (n.)

1690s, originally in reference to aboriginal inhabitants, from Australia + -an. As an adjective by 1814. Australianism in speech is attested from 1891.

Related entries & more 
larrikin (n.)

"street tough, rowdy," 1868, Australia and New Zealand, of unknown origin; perhaps somehow from the masc. proper name Larry.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
outback (n.)

"back-country, interior regions of Australia," 1907, Out Back, Australian English, originally an adverb, "out in the back settlements" (1878), from out (adv.) + back (adv.).

Related entries & more 
lory (n.)

small parrot of New Guinea and Australia, 1690s, from Malay (Austronesian) luri, name of kind of parrot, said to be a dialectal variant of nuri. Related: Lorikeet.

Related entries & more 
bludger (n.)

"prostitute's pimp," 1856, short for bludgeoner, agent noun from bludgeon (v.). Hence, also, in Australia and New Zealand slang, "loafer" (by 1939).

Related entries & more 
boomerang (n.)

"missile weapon used by Australian aborigines," 1827, adapted from an extinct Aboriginal languages of New South Wales, Australia. Another variant, perhaps, was wo-mur-rang (1798).

Related entries & more 
Kanaka (n.)

U.S. nautical word for "a Hawaiian," 1840, from Hawaiian kanaka "man" (cognate with Samoan tangata). In Australia, "native of the South Sea islands" working on sugar plantations, etc.

Related entries & more 

Page 2