Etymology
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man-made (adj.)

also manmade, "made or contrived by man," 1718, from man (n.) + made. In early use typically of institutions, etc., and opposed to what is natural or divine. Of textile fibers, foodstuffs, etc., by mid-20c.

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man-eater (n.)

also maneater, c. 1600, "a cannibal," from man (n.) + eater. By 1829 in reference to the great white shark; by 1840 of tigers in India that have acquired a taste for human flesh and have a special propensity for killing and eating humans; later also of lions. Also used of horses that tend to bite (1840). By 1906 of women (the female equivalent of a womanizer). Related: Man-eating.

The term Man-eater is applied to those Tigers, which, deserting their usual haunts in the jungle, frequent the neighbourhood of Villages, and prey chiefly on men. They are almost invariably found to be old animals, and generally females. They are usually very cunning and cowardly. [Capt. Walter Campbell, "The Old Forest Ranger; or, Wild Sports of India," 1842]
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ape-man (n.)

also apeman, hypothetical "missing link" between the highest anthropoid apes and human beings, progenitor of the human race, 1869, in a translation of Haeckel, from ape (n.) + man (n.). Man-ape is attested from 1823 as "anthropoid ape, orangutan." The name Martin Halfape appears in an English roll from 1227.

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man-like (adj.)

also manlike, mid-15c., "masculine, manly, having qualities proper or becoming to a man," from man (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "resembling man in form or nature" is from 1580s.

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man-stealer (n.)

also manstealer, "one who kidnaps human beings to sell into slavery," 1580s, from man (n. ) + agent noun from steal (v.).

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G-man (n.)
"FBI agent," 1930, shortening of government man; used earlier in an Irish context (1917), but the abbreviation is perhaps the same one.
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he-man (n.)
"especially masculine fellow," 1832, originally among U.S. pioneers, from he + man (n.).
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man-hater (n.)

"misanthrope," 1570s, from man (n.) + hater. Old English had mannhata "man-hater." Often in old use of Timon of Athens. Meaning "a woman who hates the male sex" is by 1839.

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foe-man (n.)
also foeman, "active enemy," late Old English fah-man; see foe + man (n.).
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man-killer (n.)

also mankiller, "murderer, homicide," early 15c., from man (n.) + killer. Old English words for this were manslaga, manslieht, and earlier in Middle English was man-queller (mid-13c., also "official executioner"). Middle English had also man-qualm "mass death among people (from plague, etc.), slaughter" (see qualm).

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