Etymology
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comportment (n.)

"personal bearing, carriage, behavior, demeanor," 1590s, from French comportement "bearing, behavior," from comporter (13c.) "to behave," from Latin comportare "to bring together, collect," from com "with, together" (see com-) + portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over")

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comparable (adj.)

"capable of being compared," early 15c., from Old French comparable, from Latin comparabilis "capable of comparison," from comparare "make equal with, liken, bring together for a contest," from com "with, together" (see com-) + par "equal" (see par (n.)). Related: Comparably; comparability.

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conurbation (n.)

1915, from con-, assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + urbs "city" (see urban (adj.)) + noun ending -ation. Coined by Scottish biologist and urban planner Patrick Geddes in "Cities in Evolution."

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compositor (n.)

"a typesetter engaged in picking up, arranging, and distributing letters or type in a printing office," 1560s, agent noun from past participle stem of Latin componere "to put together, to collect a whole from several parts," from com "with, together" (see com-) + ponere "to place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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compute (v.)

1630s, "determine by calculation," from French computer (16c.), from Latin computare "to count, sum up, reckon together," from com "with, together" (see com-) + putare "to reckon," originally "to prune," from PIE root *pau- (2) "to cut, strike, stamp." A doublet of count (v.). Related: Computed; computing.

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compos mentis (adj.)

Latin, literally "in command of one's mind," from compos "having the mastery of," from com "with, together" (see com-) + stem of potis "powerful, master" (from PIE root *poti- "powerful; lord"), + mentis, genitive of mens "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think").

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cuspidor (n.)

"spittoon," 1779, a colonial word, from Portuguese cuspidor "spittoon," from cuspir "to spit," from Latin conspuere "spit on," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + spuere "to spit" (see spew (v.)).

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colloquy (n.)

mid-15c., "a discourse," from Latin colloquium "conference, conversation," literally "a speaking together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see com-) + -loquium "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Meaning "conversation" is attested in English from 1580s.

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consolatory (adj.)

mid-15c., "tending to give consolation," from Latin consolatorius, from consolator, agent noun from consolari "offer solace, encourage, comfort, cheer," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + solari "to comfort" (see solace (n.)).

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compartment (n.)

a part separated from adjoining parts by a partition," "1560s, from French compartiment "part partitioned off" (16c.), through Italian compartimento, from Late Latin compartiri "to divide," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + partis, genitive of pars "a part, piece, a share, a division" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot").

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