Etymology
cockspur (n.)

"sharp spur on the leg of a male gallinaceous bird," 1590s, from cock (n.1) + spur (n.).

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cockchafer (n.)

popular name of a common European beetle, the May-beetle, 1690s, from cock (n.1), in reference to its size, + chafer "beetle."

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shuttlecock (n.)

"feathered lump of cork (or similar substance) batted back and forth between players in a game," 1570s, from shuttle (v.) + cock (n.2).

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cockerel (n.)

"young domestic cock" (up to 1 year old), mid-15c. (late 12c. as a surname), apparently a diminutive of cock (n.1). Despite the form, no evidence that it is from French.

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cockpit (n.)

1580s, "a pit or enclosed space for fighting cocks," from cock (n.1) + pit (n.1). Used in nautical sense (1706) for midshipmen's compartment below decks; transferred to airplanes (1914) and to racing cars (1930s).

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cockeyed (adj.)

1821, "squint-eyed," perhaps from cock (v.) in some sense + eye (n.). Figurative sense of "absurd, askew, crazy" is from 1896; that of "drunk" is attested from 1926. Cockeye "a squinting eye" is attested from 1825.

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cocksure (adj.)

also cock-sure, 1510s, "certain, confident," from cock (n.1) + sure (adj.). Probably "as assured as a cock." "The word was originally perfectly dignified, and habitually used in the most solemn connexions" [OED]. D.H. Lawrence playfully coined hensure as a female version (1929).

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woodcock (n.)
Old English wuducoc, from wudu (see wood (n.)) + coc (see cock (n.1)).
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petcock (n.)

also pet-cock, "a small plug-cock, made to be fastened to a pipe and used for draining water and condensation from steam cylinders, etc.," 1864, from cock (n.2); the signification of the first element is uncertain.

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pillock (n.)

"the penis," 1530s (mid-13c. as a surname), dialectal variant of Middle English pil-cok, pillicock "the penis" (see cock (n.3)). Meaning "stupid person" is attested by 1967.

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