Etymology
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preclude (v.)

1610s, "prevent by anticipative action," from Latin praecludere "to close, shut off; hinder, impede," from prae "before, ahead" (see pre-) + claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The more literal sense of "close, shut up, prevent access to" (1620s) probably is obsolete. Related: Precluded; precluding.

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cloison (n.)

"a partition, a dividing band," 1690s, from French cloison, from Vulgar Latin *clausionem (nominative *clausio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Cloisonnage.

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claustral (adj.)

mid-15c., "of or pertaining to a cloister, monastic," from Medieval Latin claustralis "pertaining to a claustrum," ("cloister"), from past participle of Latin claudere "to close" (see close (v.), and compare cloister). From 1862 as "resembling a cloister."

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exclusion (n.)

"act of shutting out; non-inclusion," c. 1400, exclusioun, from Latin exclusionem (nominative exclusio) "a shutting out," noun of action from past-participle stem of excludere "keep out, shut out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)).

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exclude (v.)

"to shut out, debar from admission or participation, prevent from entering or sharing," mid-14c., from Latin excludere "keep out, shut out, hinder," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Excluded; excluding.

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cloisonne (adj.)

"divided into compartments, partitioned" (especially in reference to surface decoration), 1863, from French cloisonné, from cloison "a partition" (12c., in Old French, "enclosure"), from Provençal clausio, from Vulgar Latin *clausio, noun of action from past participle stem of claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.) ).

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claustrophobia (n.)

"morbid fear of being shut up in a confined space," coined 1879 (in article by Italian-born, French-naturalized Swiss-English physician Dr. Benjamin Ball), with -phobia "fear" + Latin claustrum "a bolt, a means of closing; a place shut in, confined place, frontier fortress" (in Medieval Latin "cloister"), from past participle of claudere "to close" (see close (v.)).

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closed (adj.)

"made shut, not open," c. 1200, past-participle adjective from close (v.). Closed circuit "complete, unbroken (electrical) circuit" is attested from 1827; closed shop"workplace in which only union members are employed" is from 1904; closed system first recorded 1896 in William James as "complete and unalterable system (of doctrines, etc.)." Later used in a physical sense, "system in which the total mass or energy remains constant."

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include (v.)
early 15c., "to shut (someone or something) in materially, enclose, imprison, confine," also "to have (something) as a constituent part," from Latin includere "to shut in, enclose, imprison, insert," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The alleged Sam Goldwyn-ism "Include me out" is attested from 1937. Related: Included; including.
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occlude (v.)

"to shut up or stop up so as to prevent anything from passing through," 1590s, from Latin occludere (past participle occlusus) "shut up, close up," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, against" (see ob-) + claudere "to shut, close" (see close (v.)). Of teeth, "come in contact with another tooth," 1888. Related: Occluded; occluding.

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