Etymology
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optometrist (n.)

"one whose profession is to measure the range and power of vision," 1903; see optometry + -ist.

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televangelist (n.)

1973, from tele(vision) + evangelist. Earliest usages are in reference to Rex Humbard (television evangelist is from 1958).

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eye-shot (n.)

also eyeshot, "range of vision," 1580s, from eye (n.) + shot (n.) in the sense of "range" (as in bowshot).

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blinkered (adj.)

in the figurative sense, 1849, from horses being fitted with blinders to limit the range of their vision (see blinker).

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blindfold (n.)

1880, "something wrapped around the head over the eyes to take away vision," from blindfold (v.). Earlier in this sense was blindfolder (1640s).

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voila (interj.)

1739, French voilà, imperative of voir "to see, to view" (from Latin videre "to see;" see vision) + la "there" (from Latin ille "yonder;" see le).

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kenning (n.2)

early 14c., "sign, token; teaching, instruction;" c. 1400, "range of vision," also "mental cognition;" late 15c., "sight, view;" verbal nouns from ken (v.).

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cumbrous (adj.)

late 14c., of things, "obstructing movement or vision;" c. 1400, "cumbersome, troublesome, clumsy, unwieldy, difficult to use," also of persons, "causing trouble," from cumber + -ous.

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glimpse (n.)

1530s, "faint or transient appearance," from glimpse (v.). From 1570s as "a brief and imperfect view." Earlier was the verbal noun glimpsing "imperfect vision" (late 14c.).

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optometry (n.)

"measurement of the range of vision; measurement of the visual powers in general," 1886, from optometer (1738), name given to an instrument for testing vision, from opto- "sight," from Greek optos "seen, visible" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + -metry "a measuring of." Probably influenced by French optométrie.

When I made the foregoing Experiments, I designed to repeat them with more Care and Exactness, and to make some new ones of the same Sort, by means of an Instrument I had contrived for that Purpose; which from its Use in measuring the Limits of distinct Vision, and in determining with great Exactness the Strength and Weakness of Sight, may be called an Optometer. [Dr. William Porterfield, "An Essay Concerning the Motions of our Eyes, Part II," in Medical Essays and Observations, Vol. IV, Edinburgh, 1738]
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