Etymology
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guiser (n.)
"masquerader, mummer, one who goes from house to house, whimsically disguised, and making diversion with songs and antics, usually at Christmas," late 15c., agent noun from guise.
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Natalie 

fem. proper name, from French Natalie, from Church Latin Natalia, from Latin (dies) natalis "birthday," in Church Latin, "Christmas Day," from natalis "pertaining to birth or origin," from natus, past participle of nasci "to be born" (Old Latin gnasci), from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget." Probably originally a name for one born on Christmas. A top-20 name for girls born in the U.S. from 2005 to 2012.

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ember-goose (n.)

also embergoose, "loon," 1744, from Norwegian emmer-gaas, perhaps so called from its appearing on the coast in the ember-days before Christmas.

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caroling (n.)
c. 1300, "a round dance accompanied by singing," verbal noun from carol (v.). As "a going from place to place in a group singing Christmas carols" by 1879.
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snapdragon (n.)
garden plant, 1570s, from snap (n.) + dragon. So called from fancied resemblance of antirrhinum flowers to a dragon's mouth. As the name of a Christmas game of plucking raisins from burning brandy and eating them alight, from 1704.
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yule (n.)

Old English geol, geola "Christmas Day, Christmastide," which is cognate with Old Norse jol (plural), the name of a heathen feast, later taken over by Christianity; the Germanic word is of unknown origin. The Old English (Anglian) cognate giuli was the Anglo-Saxons' name for a two-month midwinter season corresponding to Roman December and January, a time of important feasts but not itself a festival.

After conversion to Christianity the word narrowed to mean "the 12-day feast of the Nativity" (which began Dec. 25), but was replaced by Christmas by 11c., except in the northeast (areas of Danish settlement), where it remained the usual word.

Revived 19c. by writers to mean "the Christmas of 'Merrie England.' " First direct reference to the Yule log is 17c. According to some sources, Old Norse jol was borrowed into Old French as jolif, hence Modern French joli "pretty, nice," originally "festive" (see jolly).

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mince (n.)

"minced meat," 1850; see mincemeat. Mince-pie "pie made with minced meat, fruit, etc.," long associated in England with Christmas festivities, is attested from c. 1600; as rhyming slang for eye (n.) it is attested by 1857. 

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Grinch (n.)
"spoilsport;" all usages trace to Dr. Seuss's 1957 book "How the Grinch Stole Christmas." Kipling used grinching (1892) in reference to a harsh, grating noise; and Grinch had been used as the surname of severe characters in fiction at least since 1903.
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misrule (n.)

late 14c., misreule, "bad government of a state;" see mis- (1) + rule (n.). Meaning "disorderly conduct or living, absence of control or restraint" is from c. 1400, obsolete except in Lord of Misrule, one chosen to preside over Christmas games in a great house (late 15c.). Related: Misruly.

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wassail 
mid-12c., from Old Norse ves heill "be healthy," a salutation, from ves, imperative of vesa "to be" (see was) + heill "healthy," from Proto-Germanic *haila- (see health). Use as a drinking phrase appears to have arisen among Danes in England and spread to native inhabitants.

A similar formation appears in Old English wes þu hal, but this is not recorded as a drinking salutation. Sense extended c. 1300 to "liquor in which healths were drunk," especially spiced ale used in Christmas Eve celebrations. Meaning "a carousal, reveling" first attested c. 1600. Wassailing "custom of going caroling house to house at Christmas time" is recorded from 1742.
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