Etymology
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fried (adj.)
mid-14c., past-participle adjective from fry (v.). Fried chicken attested by 1832.
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chickweed (n.)

late 14c., chekwede, applied to various plants eaten by chickens, from chick + weed (n.). In Old English such plants were cicene mete "chicken food."

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pule (v.)

"cry in a thin, weak voice, as a complaining child," 1530s, from French piauler (16c.) "to cheep, chirp," which is echoic (compare Italian pigolare "to cheep as a chicken"). Related: Puled; puling.

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peeper (n.)

1650s, "one who peeps," agent noun from peep (v.1). Slang meaning "eye" is c. 1700.

From 1590s as "young chicken, little creature which peeps or chirps," and 1857 as "tree frog" (American English), both from peep (v.2).

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broiler (n.)
late 14c., "grill or gridiron used in broiling," agent noun from broil (v.1). From c. 1300 as a surname, perhaps meaning "cook who specializes in broiling." Meaning "chicken for broiling" is from 1858.
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peep (n.2)

"a short chirp, the cry of a mouse or young chick or other small bird," mid-15c., from peep (v.2); meaning "slightest sound or utterance" (usually in a negative context) is attested by 1903. Meaning "young chicken" is from 1680s. The marshmallow peeps confection are said to date from the 1950s.

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monomania (n.)

"insanity in regard to a single subject or class of subjects; mental action perverted to a specific delusion or an impulse to do a particular thing," 1820, probably on model of earlier French monomanie (1819), from Modern Latin monomania, from Greek monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + mania (see mania).

Men of one idea, like a hen with one chicken, and that a duckling. [Thoreau, "Walden"]
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paella (n.)

Spanish dish of rice with chicken and other meat, seafood, vegetables, etc., cooked together in a large, flat pan, 1892, from Catalan paella, from Old French paele "cooking or frying pan" (Modern French poêle), from Latin patella "small pan, little dish, platter," diminutive of patina "broad shallow pan, stew-pan" (see pan (n.)). So called for the pan in which it is cooked.

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polecat (n.)

"small, dark-brown, northern European predatory quadruped of the weasel family," noted as a chicken-thief and for its strong, offensive smell, early 14c., pol-cat, from cat (n.); the first element is perhaps Anglo-French pol, from Old French poule "fowl, hen" (see pullet (n.)); so called because it preys on poultry [Skeat]. The other alternative is that the first element is from Old French pulent "stinking." Originally the European Putorius foetidus; the name was extended to related North American skunks by 1680s.

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pucelle (n.)

"maid, virgin, young woman," mid-15c., especially in historical reference to Joan of Arc, the "Maid of Orleans" (called in Old French la pucelle from c. 1423), according to French sources from Vulgar Latin *pulicella "maid" (source also of Italian pulcella), diminutive of Latin pulla, fem. of pullus "young animal," especially a chicken (see foal (n.)), but there are difficulties with this derivation. Also, in 16c.-17c. English, "a drab, a slut; a wanton girl, a harlot."

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