Etymology
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chickadee (n.)

popular name of the American black-capped titmouse, 1834, American English, echoic of its cry.

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chickpea (n.)

also chick-pea, 1712, a false singular of chich-pease (1540s), earlier simply chich (late 14c.), cich, from Old French chiche "chick-pea" (13c.), from Latin cicer "pea," which is of uncertain origin, but with likely cognates in Greek kikerroi "pale," Armenian sisern "chick-pea," Albanian thjer "lentil." The Latin plural, cicera, is also the source of Italian cece and was borrowed into Old High German as chihhra (German Kichererbse).

The English word was altered after 17c. on the model of French pois chiche , and folk-etymologized as chick-. For second element, see pease.

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chicken pox (n.)

c. 1730, from chicken (n.) + pox. Perhaps so called for its mildness compared to smallpox [Barnhart], or its generally appearing in children, or its resemblance to chick-peas.

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chicken-shit 
1947 (n.) "contemptible cowardly person;" 1948 (adj.); from chicken + shit (n.).
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Chicano (n.)

"person of Mexican heritage in the U.S.," 1947, from Mexican Spanish dialectal pronunciation of Mexicano "Mexican," with loss of initial unaccented syllable [Barnhart]. Said to have been in use among Mexican-Americans from c. 1911. Probably influenced by Spanish chico "boy," which also is used as a nickname. The adjective in English is attested by 1967. Fem. form is Chicana.

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Chicago (n.)

town founded in 1833, named from a Canadian French form of an Algonquian word, which, according to Bright, is either Fox /sheka:ko:heki/ "place of the wild onion," or Ojibwa shika:konk "at the skunk place" (sometimes rendered "place of the bad smell"). The Ojibwa "skunk" word is distantly related to the New England Algonquian word that yielded Modern English skunk (n.). Related: Chicagoan (1847; Chicagoian is from 1859).

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chicane (n.)

a word used in English in various senses, including "act of chicanery, art of gaining advantage by using evasions or cheating tricks" (1670s), also "obstacles on a roadway" (by 1935), also a term in bridge (1880s), apparently all ultimately from an archaic verb chicane "to trick" (1670s), from French chicane "trickery" (16c.), from chicaner "to pettifog, quibble" (15c., see chicanery).

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Chickasaw 

native American people formerly of Mississippi and Alabama, 1670s, from Chickasaw Chikasha, the people's name for themselves. Also their (Muskogean) language.

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chicle (n.)

"elastic substance obtained from a tropical American tree, formerly used in the manufacture of chewing-gum," 1877, American English (in chicle-gum), from Mexican Spanish chicle, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) tzictli.

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chicken (v.)

"to back down or fail through cowardice," 1943, U.S. slang, from chicken (n.), almost always with out (adv.). Related: Chickened; chickening.

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