Etymology
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lignin (n.)
organic substance forming the basis of wood-cells, 1821, from Latin lignum "wood" (see ligni-) + chemical suffix -in (2).
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taurine (n.)
also taurin, chemical substance (aminoethyl-sulphonic acid), 1845, from Latin taurus "bull" (see Taurus) + chemical suffix -ine (2); obtained by German professor Leopold Gmelin in 1826 and so called because it was first found in ox bile.
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lipid (n.)
"organic substance of the fat group," 1925, from French lipide, coined 1923 by G. Bertrand from Greek lipos "fat, grease" (see lipo-) + chemical suffix -ide.
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acetaminophen (n.)
U.S. name for "para-acetylaminophenol," 1960, composed of syllables from the chemical name: acetyl, a derivative of acetic (q.v.; also see acetylene) + amino- + phenol. In Britain, the same substance is paracetamol.
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catalyst (n.)

"substance which speeds a chemical reaction but itself remains unchanged," 1900, formed in English (on analogy of analyst) from catalysis. Figurative use by 1943.

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gel (n.)

"semi-solid substance," 1899, as a chemical term, short for gelatin and perhaps influenced by jell. The invention of this word is credited to Scottish chemist Thomas Graham. Hair-styling sense is from 1958.

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fibrin (n.)
blood-clotting substance, 1800, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber) + chemical suffix -in (2). So called because it is deposited as a network of fibers that cause the blood to clot.
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dentin (n.)

also dentine, the bone-like substance in teeth (as distinguished from enamel or pulp), 1836, from combining form of Latin dens (genitive dentis) "tooth" (from PIE root *dent- "tooth") + chemical suffix -in (2). Related: Dentinal.

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margarin (n.)

1836, from French margarine, a chemical term given to a fatty substance obtained from animal and vegetable oil, coined by French chemist Michel Eugène Chevreul (1786-1889) in 1813 from (acide) margarique "margaric (acid);" literally "pearly," from Greek margaritēs "pearl" (see Margaret). So called for the luster of the crystals. Now discarded in this sense as a chemical term, but preserved in margarine.

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creatine (n.)

organic substance obtained from muscular tissue, by 1843, from French creatine, from Greek kreas "flesh, meat" (from PIE root *kreue- "raw flesh") + chemical suffix -ine (2). Discovered 1832 by French physicist Michel-Eugène Chevreul (1786-1889) and named by him.

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