Etymology
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check-up (n.)

also checkup, "careful examination," 1921, American English, from the verbal phrase (1889), from check (v.1) + up (adv.), on notion of a checklist of things to be examined. The verbal phrase check up (on) is attested from 1889.

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spell-check (v.)
"to use a computer's spell checker application on a document," by 1985, from spell (v.) + check (v.1). The applications themselves date to the late 1970s. Related: Spell-checked; spell-checking.
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check-list (n.)

also checklist, "systematic list intended for reference, verification, etc.," 1849, American English, from check (v.1) + list (n.1).

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cross-check (n.)

1903 in research and accounting, from the verbal phrase, from cross (adv.) + check (v.1). As a verb in hockey, "obstruct by holding one's stick across an opponent," from 1901; as a noun by 1968. Related: Cross-checked; cross-checking.

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check-book (n.)

also checkbook, cheque-book, "book containing blank checks on a bank," 1872, from check (n.1) in the financial sense + book (n.).

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hold-out (n.)
also holdout, one who abstains or refrains when others do not, by 1911, from verbal expression hold out, which is attested from 1907 in the sense "keep back, detain, withhold" (see hold (v.) + out (adv.)). Earlier as the name of a card-sharper's device (1893). The verbal phrase is attested from 1520s as "stretch forth," 1580s as "resist pressure."
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hand-out (n.)
also handout, hand out, 1882, "alms or food given to a beggar," hobo slang, from the verbal phrase; see hand (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "distributed printed informational matter" is from 1927.
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cop out 

by 1942, noun ("a cowardly escape, an evasion") and verb ("sneak off, escape, give up without trying"), American English slang, perhaps from cop a plea (c. 1925) "plead guilty to lesser charges," which is probably from northern British slang cop "to catch" (a scolding, etc.); as in cop a feel "grope someone" (1930s); see cop (v.). Sense of "evade an issue or problem" is from 1960s.

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drop-out (n.)

also dropout, "one who 'drops out' of something" (a course of education, life, etc.), 1930, from the verbal phrase drop out "withdraw or disappear from place" (1550s); see drop (v.) + out (adv.). 

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blow-out (n.)
also blowout, 1825, American English colloquial, "outburst, brouhaha" (what in modern vernacular would be called a blow-up), from the verbal phrase, in reference to pressure in a steam engine, etc., from blow (v.1) + out (adv.). Meaning "abundant feast" is recorded from 1824; that of "a bursting of an automobile tire" is from 1908.
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