Etymology
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change-over (n.)

"alteration from one system to another," 1907, from the verbal phrase; see change (v.) + over (adv.).

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stand-by (n.)
also standby, 1796, "that which stands by one," originally nautical, of a vessel kept nearby for emergencies, from verbal phrase stand by "await, support, remain beside" (mid-13c.); see stand (v.) + by. Meaning "state of being ready for duty" is from 1946. In civil aviation, as an adjective meaning "without a booked ticket," from 1961. As an order to hold one's self in readiness, it is recorded from 1660s.
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by-path (n.)
"side road," late 14c., from by + path.
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by-road (n.)
"side road," 1670s, from by + road.
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passer-by (n.)
also passerby, 1560s, from agent noun of pass (v.) + by; earlier, this sense was in passager (see passenger).
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fly-by-night (n.)
1796, slang, said by Grose to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch; used from 1823 in reference to anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity, especially while owing money. The different senses involve the two verbs fly.
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plus ca change 

phrase expressing the fundamental immutability of life, human situations, etc., 1903, French, plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose (1849), literally "the more it changes, the more it stays the same."

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Erewhon (n.)

"utopia," from title of a book published 1872 by British author Samuel Butler, a partial reversal of nowhere.

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ver- 
German prefix "denoting destruction, reversal, or completion" [Watkins], from Proto-Germanic *fer-, *far-, from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through."
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kayo 
spelled-out form of K.O. (for knockout in the pugilism sense), from 1923. Also used in 1920s as a slang reversal of OK.
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