Etymology
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cathedra (n.)

"seat of a bishop in his church," 1829, Latin, literally "chair" (see cathedral).

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rocking (adj.)

"moving back and forth or to and fro," late 14c., rokking, present-participle adjective from rock (v.1). Of music, from 1949 (see rock (v.2)). Rocking-horse "wooden horse mounted on rockers for children" is recorded from 1724; rocking-chair "chair mounted on rockers" is from 1766.

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ladder-back (adj.)
1898 as a type of chair, from ladder (n.) + back (n.).
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lounging (n.)
1790, verbal noun from lounge (v.). Lounge chair is from 1841.
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recliner (n.)

1660s, "one who or that which reclines," agent noun from recline. From 1880 as a type of chair the back of which can be tilted as desired, earlier known as a reclining-chair (1831). Middle English had reclinatorie "a canopied bed or couch" (early 15c.).

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dodecahedron (n.)

"solid having twelve faces," 1560s, from Greek dōdeka "twelve" (see dodeca-) + hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Related: Dodecahedral.

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cathedral (n.)

1580s, "church of a bishop," from phrase cathedral church (c. 1300), partially translating Late Latin ecclesia cathedralis "church of a bishop's seat," from Latin cathedra "an easy chair (principally used by ladies)," also metonymically, as in cathedrae molles "luxurious women;" also "a professor's chair;" from Greek kathedra "seat, bench," from kata "down" (see cata-) + hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."

It was born an adjective, and attempts to force further adjectivization onto it in 17c. yielded cathedraical (1670s), cathedratic (1660s), cathedratical (1660s), after which the effort seems to have been given up.

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stroller (n.)
c. 1600, "strolling player;" 1670s, "one who strolls, a wanderer," agent noun from stroll (v.). Meaning "child's push-chair" is from 1920.
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decahedron (n.)

in geometry, "a solid having ten faces," 1828, from deca- "ten" + -hedron, from Greek hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."  Related: Decahedral.

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rocker (n.)

1852, "a rocking chair," American English, agent noun from rock (v.1). Middle English had rokker, "nurse charged with rocking a cradle" (early 14c.). In sense of "one of the curved pieces of wood that makes a chair or cradle rock" it dates from 1787. Meaning "one who enjoys rock music" (opposed to mod (n.1)) is recorded from 1963, from rock (v.2).

Slang off (one's) rocker "crazy" is attested by 1897 according to OED; a widely reprinted 1903 newspaper column in U.S. identified it as British slang; the image is perhaps mechanical. To get (off) one's rocker seems to have been used earlier in U.S. baseball slang for "get busy, get active in a game" (1895) and does suggest the rocking-chair.

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