Etymology
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discontinue (v.)

late 14c., discontinuen, "be interrupted, cease, stop," from Old French discontinuer (14c.), from Medieval Latin discontinuare "discontinue," from dis- "not" (see dis-) + Latin continuare "to continue" (see continue). Transitive sense "cause to cease" is from late 15c. Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous; discontinuation.

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intermittent (adj.)
c. 1600, from Latin intermittentem (nominative intermittens), present participle of intermittere "to leave off, cease, pause" (see intermission). Related: Intermittently.
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posada (n.)

"inn," 1763, from Spanish posada "home, lodging," from posar "to repose, rest, lodge," from Medieval Latin pausare "to halt, cease, pause; to lodge," from pausa (see pause (n.)).

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flatline (v.)
"give no indication of life, cease to function," by 1998, from the flat (adj.) line (n.) on an electrocardiogram or electroencephalogram when the patient is dead. Related: Flatlined; flatlining.
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peter (v.)

"to diminish gradually and then cease," 1812, colloquial, of uncertain origin. To peter out "become exhausted," is 1846 as miners' slang. Related: Petered; petering.

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let-up (n.)
"cessation, restraint, relaxation, intermission," 1837, from verbal phrase let up "cease, stop" (1787). In Old English the phrase meant "to put ashore" (let out meant "put to sea"). Bartlett (1848) says the noun is "an expression borrowed from pugilists."
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pause (v.)

"make a temporary stop or intermission," 1520s, from pause (n.) and from French pauser, from Late Latin pausare "to halt, cease, pause," ultimately from Late Latin pausa. Related: Paused; pausing.

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disuse (v.)

c. 1400, disusen, "to misuse, pervert;" mid-15c., "become unaccustomed" (both senses now obsolete), from or on analogy of Old French desuser, from des- "not" (see dis-) + user "use" (see use (v.)). Meaning "cease to use, neglect to employ" is from late 15c.

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rest (v.1)

[to repose; to cease from action] Middle English resten, from Old English ræstan, restan "take repose by lying down; lie in death or in the grave; cease from motion, work, or performance; be still or motionless; be undisturbed, be free from what disquiets; stand or lie as upon a support or basis," from Proto-Germanic *rastejanan (source also of Old Saxon restian, Old Frisian resta, Middle Dutch rasten, Dutch rusten, Old High German reston, German rasten, Swedish rasta, Danish raste "to rest"), a word of doubtful etymology (compare rest (n.1)).

Transitive senses "give repose to; lay or place, as on a support or basis" are from early 13c. Meaning "cease from, have intermission" is late 14c., also "rely on for support." In law, "voluntarily end the presentation of evidence to allow presentation of counter-evidence by the opposing party," by 1905. Related: Rested; resting.

To rest up "recover one's strength" is by 1895, American English. To rest in "remain confident or hopeful in" is by late 14c., biblical. Resting place "place safe from toil or danger" is from mid-14c.

Rest signifies primarily to cease from action or work, but naturally by extension to be refreshed by doing so, and further to be refreshed by sleeping. Repose does not necessarily imply previous work, but does imply quietness, and generally a reclining position, while we may rest in a standing position. [Century Dictionary]
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parley (v.)

late 14c., parlen, "to speak, talk, confer," probably a borrowing of Old French parler "to speak" (see parley (n.)). Related: Parleyed; parleying. Meaning "to discuss terms," especially "to confer with an enemy," as on exchange of prisoners, a cease-fire, etc., is by 1560s, from the noun.

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