Etymology
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stack (v.)

early 14c., "to pile up (grain) into a stack," from stack (n.). Meaning "arrange (a deck of cards) unfairly" (in stack the deck) is first recorded 1825. Stack up "compare against" is 1903, from notion of piles of poker chips (1896). Of aircraft waiting to land, from 1941. Related: Stacked; Stacking.

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hatchway (n.)

"square or oblong opening in the deck of a ship," 1620s, from hatch (n.) + way (n.).

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pilot-house (n.)

"enclosed place on the deck of a ship which shelters the steering-gear and the pilot," by 1846, from pilot (n.) + house (n.).

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decker (adj.)

in combinations, "having a (specified) number of decks," originally of vessels, 1795, from deck (n.). Later of stacked sandwiches.

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top-sider (n.)

kind of casual shoe, 1937, from topside in nautical sense of "upper deck of a ship," where the rubber soles would provide good grip; from top (n.1) + side (n.).

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coaming (n.)

1610s, nautical, "raised border or edge of a hatch" (to prevent water on deck from running below), of unknown origin.

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double-decker (n.)

1835, of ships, "with two decks above the water line;" 1867, of street vehicles, "with two floors;" see double (adj.) + deck (n.).

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gunwale (n.)

"uppermost edge of a ship's side," mid-15c., gonne walle, from gun (n.) + wale "plank" (see wale). Originally a platform on the deck of a ship to support the mounted guns.

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frigate (n.)

1580s, from French frégate (1520s), from Italian fregata (Neapolitan fregate), which with many names for types of sea vessels is of unknown origin. It is common to the Mediterranean languages (Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan fragata). Originally a small, swift vessel; the word was applied to progressively larger types over the years.

[A] light nimble vessel built for speed; employed in particular for the gleaning of intelligence and the protection and assault of trade-routes. In battle the frigates took station on the disengaged side of the fleet, where they repeated signals, sped on messages, and succoured the distressed. [Sir Geoffrey Callender, "Sea Passages," 1943]

In the old sailing navy usually they carried guns on a raised quarter-deck and forecastle, hence frigate-built (1650s) of a vessel having the quarter-deck and forecastle raised above the main-deck.

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ornament (v.)

"to adorn, deck, embellish," 1720, from ornament (n.). Middle English used ournen (late 14c.) in this sense, from Old French orner, from Latin ornare. Related: Ornamented; ornamenting.

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