Etymology
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misuse (n.)

late 14c., "improper use, misapplication," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + use (n.) and in part from Old French mesus "abuse, excess, misdeed." As "abuse, ill-treatment" it is attested from 1590s.

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sensualize (v.)

also sensualise, "render sensual, make sensual, debase by carnal gratification," 1680s, from sensual + -ize. Related: Sensualized; sensualizing; sensualization.

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tongue-lash (v.)
"scold, abuse with words," 1857, from tongue (n.) + lash (v.). Related: Tongue-lashing.
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disabuse (v.)

"free from mistake, fallacy, or deception," 1610s, from dis- + abuse (v.). Related: Disabused; disabusing.

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mistreat (v.)

"treat badly, abuse," late 15c., mistreten, from see mis- (1) + treat (v.). Related: Mistreated; mistreating.

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pederasty (n.)

"carnal union of males with males," especially "sodomy of a man with a boy," c. 1600, from French pédérastie or directly from Modern Latin pæderastia, from Greek paiderastia "love of boys," from paiderastēs "pederast, lover of boys," from pais (genitive paidos) "child, boy" (see pedo-) + erastēs "lover," from erasthai "to love" (see Eros). Related: Pederastic.

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maltreat (v.)

"to treat ill, abuse," 1708, from French maltraiter, or formed in English from mal- + treat (v.). Related: Maltreated; maltreating.

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sod (n.2)
term of abuse, 1818, short for sodomite (also see sodomy). British colloquial sod-all "nothing" is attested from 1958.
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pissy (adj.)

"of or pertaining to piss," 1926, from piss (n.) + -y (2). Figurative use as a general term of abuse is by 1972.

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abusive (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abusive

1530s (implied in abusively) "improper," from French abusif, from Latin abusivus "misapplied, improper," from abus-, past-participle stem of abuti "misuse," literally "use up" (see abuse (v.)). Meaning "full of abuse" is from 1580s. Shakespeare has abusious ("Taming of the Shrew," 1594). Abuseful "abounding in reproaches" was in use 17c.-19c. Related: Abusively; abusiveness.

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