Etymology
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introvert (n.)
1878, in zoology, "part or organ which is turned in upon itself," from introvert (v.). The psychological sense "introverted person" (opposed to extrovert) is 1917, from German, introduced there by C.G. Jung (1875-1961).
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Charlemagne 
king of the Franks (742-814), literally "Carl the Great," from French form of Medieval Latin Carolus Magnus (see Charles + Magnus).
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Charles 
masc. proper name, from French Charles, from Medieval Latin Carolus, from Middle High German Karl, literally "man, husband" (see carl).
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Zeiss (adj.)
in reference to spy-glasses or binoculars, 1905, from the firm founded by German optical instrument manufacturer Carl Zeiss (1816-1888).
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fortune cookie (n.)
by 1955, said to have been invented in 1918 by David Jung, Chinese immigrant to America who established Hong Kong Noodle Co., who handed out cookies that contained uplifting messages as a promotional gimmick.
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Mahn 
on this site, a reference to Carl August Friedrich Mahn (1802-1887), German philologist and etymologist who helped write the etymologies in the 1864 Webster's Dictionary.
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degauss (v.)

"de-magnetize," originally especially of ships as a defense against magnetic mines, 1940, from de- + the name of German scientist Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855), a pioneer in the study of magnetics.

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Carolingian (adj.)
1881, "belonging to the Frankish royal and imperial dynasty founded by Charles Martel, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Also compare Carlovingian.
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mitochondria (n.)

"organelle of cells in which biochemical processes occur," 1901, from German, coined 1898 by microbiologist Carl Benda (1857-1933), from Greek mitos "thread," a word of uncertain etymology, + khondrion "little granule," diminutive of khondros "granule, lump of salt" (see grind (v.)).

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caroline (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to a Charles," from French, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Especially of Charlemagne, or, in English history, Charles I and Charles II.
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