Etymology
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Capitol (n.)

"building in Washington, D.C., where U.S. Congress meets," 1793 (in writings of Thomas Jefferson), from Latin Capitolium, name of the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, protector of the city, on the Capitoline Hill in ancient Rome. Used earlier of Virginia state houses (1699). Its use in American public architecture deliberately evokes Roman republican imagery. With reference to the Roman citadel, Capitol is recorded in English from late 14c., via Old North French capitolie. Relationship of Capitoline to capital (adj.) is likely but not certain.

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*kaput- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "head."

It forms all or part of: achieve; behead; biceps; cabbage; cabochon; caddie; cadet; cap; cap-a-pie; cape (n.1) "garment;" cape (n.2) "promontory;" capital (adj.); capital (n.3) "head of a column or pillar;" capitate; capitation; capitulate; capitulation; capitulum; capo (n.1) "leader of a Mafia family;" capo (n.2) "pitch-altering device for a stringed instrument;" caprice; capsize; captain; cattle; caudillo; chapter; chef; chief; chieftain; corporal (n.); decapitate; decapitation; forehead; head; hetman; kaput; kerchief; mischief; occipital; precipice; precipitate; precipitation; recapitulate; recapitulation; sinciput; triceps.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kaput-; Latin caput "head;" Old English heafod, German Haupt, Gothic haubiþ "head."

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cater (v.)

c. 1600, "provide food for," from Middle English catour (n.) "buyer of provisions" (c. 1400; late 13c. as a surname), a shortening of Anglo-French achatour "buyer" (Old North French acatour, Old French achatour, 13c., Modern French acheteur), from Old French achater "to buy," originally "to buy provisions," which is perhaps from Vulgar Latin *accaptare, from Latin ad- "to" (see ad-) + captare "to take, hold," frequentative of capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

Or else from Vulgar Latin *accapitare "to add to one's capital," with second element from verbal stem of Latin caput (genitive capitis); see capital (adj.). Related: Catered; catering. Figuratively, "act as a purveyor," from 1650s.

Likely formed from the verb in English were caterie "department of a house that procured and managed meat, fish, etc." (mid-15c.); cates (n.) "foodstuffs, provisions" (late 15c.).

It is the faire acceptance, Sir, creates
    The entertaynment perfect: not the cates.
[Ben Jonson, "Inviting a Friend to Supper"]
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capitalization (n.)

1860, "act of converting (assets) to capital," noun of action from capitalize in the financial sense. The meaning "act of writing or printing in capital letters" is recorded from 1847, from the writing sense.

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capitalistic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to capital or capitalists," 1870; see capitalist + -ic.

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Seoul 

South Korean capital, from Korean soul, literally "capital." It was the national capital from 1392 until Japanese annexation in 1910.

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Beijing 

Chinese capital, from bei "north" + jing "capital" (as opposed to Nanking, literally "southern capital").

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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Pyongyang 

North Korean capital, from Korean p'yong "flat" + yang "land."

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