Etymology
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capitalize (v.)

"write or print in capital letters," 1764, from capital (n.1) + -ize. The meaning "convert (assets) to capital" is recorded from 1868, from capital (n.2). Related: Capitalized; capitalizing.

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decapitalize (v.)

"reduce from the rank or position of a capital city," 1870; see de- + capital (n.1) + -ize. As "to remove the financial capital from," by 1913, from capital (n.2). In reference to letters, "to change from upper case to lower case," by 1899. Related: Decapitalized; decapitalization.

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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Kilimanjaro 

dormant volcano in Tanzania, it is the highest mountain in Africa. The name is of unknown origin; the first element appears to be Swahili kilima "(little) mountain," but even this is uncertain.  See J.A. Hutchinson, "The Meaning of Kilimanjaro," in Tanganyika Notes and Records, 1965.

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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capitalization (n.)

1860, "act of converting (assets) to capital," noun of action from capitalize in the financial sense. The meaning "act of writing or printing in capital letters" is recorded from 1847, from the writing sense.

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Pyongyang 

North Korean capital, from Korean p'yong "flat" + yang "land."

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Kathmandu 

Nepalese capital, from Nepalese Kathmandu, from kath "wooden" + mandu "temple."

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majuscule (adj.)

1704, of a letter, "capital;" 1738 as a noun, "a capital letter," from French majuscule (16c.), from Latin maiuscula (littera), fem. of maiusculus "somewhat larger, somewhat greater," diminutive of maior (see major (adj.)).

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Beirut 

Lebanese capital, from Hebrew, literally "the wells," from be'erot, plural of be'er "well."

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