Etymology
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persea (n.)

sacred fruit-bearing tree of Egypt and Persia, c. 1600, from Latin persea, from Greek persea; Beekes says the tree name in Greek, though referring to the tree in Egypt, reflects its Persian origin. Used from early 19c. of a genus of trees and shrubs in the West Indies.

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Beijing 

Chinese capital, from bei "north" + jing "capital" (as opposed to Nanking, literally "southern capital").

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capitalize (v.)

"write or print in capital letters," 1764, from capital (n.1) + -ize. The meaning "convert (assets) to capital" is recorded from 1868, from capital (n.2). Related: Capitalized; capitalizing.

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decapitalize (v.)

"reduce from the rank or position of a capital city," 1870; see de- + capital (n.1) + -ize. As "to remove the financial capital from," by 1913, from capital (n.2). In reference to letters, "to change from upper case to lower case," by 1899. Related: Decapitalized; decapitalization.

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Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

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ibis (n.)

stork-like bird, late 14c., from Latin ibis (plural ibes), from Greek ibis, from Egyptian hab, a sacred bird of Egypt.

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Moeris 

former large lake of northern Egypt, from Greek moiris, from Egyptian mer-ur "big lake," from mer "lake" + ur "big."

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Giza 

place in Egypt, from Arabic Er-ges-her "beside the high," i.e., the Great Pyramid.

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Canberra 

capital of Australia, 1826, from Aborigine nganbirra "meeting place."

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Saladin 

Sultan of Egypt and Syria from 1174-93, target of the Third Crusade (1189-1192); in full Salah-ad-din Yusuf ibn-Ayyub (1137-1193).

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