Etymology
Advertisement
mensural (adj.)

c. 1600, in music, "having a fixed measure;" 1650s, "pertaining to measure, measurable," from Medieval Latin mensuralis, from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
remeasure (v.)

also re-measure, "to measure again or anew," 1580s, from re- "again" + measure (v.). Related: Remeasured; remeasuring; remeasurement.

Related entries & more 
capacitance (n.)
"ability to store an electric charge," 1893, from capacity + -ance.
Related entries & more 
commensurable (adj.)

"having a common measure" (as a yard and a foot, both of which may be measured by inches), 1550s, from Late Latin commensurabilis "having a common measure," from com "together, with" (see com-) + Latin mensurabilis "that can be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure."

Related entries & more 
mensurable (adj.)

"capable of being measured," late 14c., from Medieval Latin mensurabilis "able to be measured," from mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Related: Mensurably; mensurability.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
maneuverability (n.)

also maneuvrability, "capacity for being maneuvered," especially of automobiles and aircraft, 1914, from maneuverable + -ity.

Related entries & more 
ephah (n.)
Hebrew dry measure, probably of Egyptian origin (compare Coptic epi "measure").
Related entries & more 
barrel (n.)

"cylindrical vessel or cask, generally bulging in the middle and made of wooden staves bound by hoops," c. 1300, from Old French baril "barrel, cask, vat" (12c.), with cognates in all Romance languages (Italian barile, Spanish barril, etc.), but of unknown origin. Also a measure of capacity of varying quantity.

The meaning "metal tube of a gun" is from 1640s. Barrel-roll (n.) in aeronautics is from 1920. To be over a barrel figuratively, "in a helpless or vulnerable condition," is by 1914 and might suggest corporal punishment.

Related entries & more 
mensuration (n.)

"act of measuring," 1570s, from French mensuration or directly from Late Latin mensurationem (nominative mensuratio) "a measuring," noun of action from past-participle stem of mensurare "to measure," from Latin mensura "a measuring, a measurement; thing to measure by," from mensus, past participle of metiri "to measure" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure").

Related entries & more 
practicability (n.)

"feasibility, capacity for being practiced," 1720, from practicable + -ity. The earlier word was practicableness (1640s). 

Related entries & more 

Page 2