Etymology
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down-market (adj.)

"on the cheaper end of what is available," 1970, from down (adj.) + market (n.).

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clamp-down (n.)

also clampdown, 1940 in the figurative sense "a firm, oppressive or harsh suppression or preventive action," from verbal phrase clamp down "use pressure to keep down" (1924). The verbal phrase in the figurative sense is recorded from 1941. See clamp (v.) + down (adv.).

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sit-down (adj.)
1836 of meals, 1936 of strikes, from verbal phrase (c. 1200), from sit (v.) + down (adv.); as a noun, sit-down "act of sitting down" is from 1861.
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shake-down (n.)
also shakedown, 1730, "impromptu bed made upon loose straw," from verbal phrase; see shake (v.) + down (adv.). Meaning "forced contribution" (1902) is from the verbal phrase in a slang sense "blackmail, extort" (1872). Meaning "a thorough search" is from 1914; perhaps from the notion of measuring corn. The oldest use of the verbal phrase shake down is "cause to totter and fall" (c. 1400).
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mark-down (n.)

"reduction in price," 1880, from the verbal expression mark down "reduce in price" (1859), from mark (v.) in the sense of "put a numerical price on an object for sale" + down (adv.). Mark down as "make a note of" is by 1881.

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put-down (n.)

"insult, snub," 1962, from verbal phrase put down "to snub," attested from c. 1400 in this sense, earlier (c. 1300) "to lower, let down," also (mid-14c.) "to throw down, reject;" see put (v.) + down (adv.). To put (something) down "end by force or authority" (a rebellion, etc.) is from mid-14c.  

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come-down (n.)

"setback, sudden change for the worse in one's circumstances," 1840, from verbal phrase; see come (v.) + down (adv.). In 16c.-17c. "total destruction" was expressed metaphorically as "to come to Castle Comedown" (1560s).

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let-down (n.)
also letdown, "a disappointment," 1768, from let (v.) + down (adv.). The verbal phrase is from mid-12c. in a literal sense "cause to be lowered," of drawbridges, etc.; figuratively by 1754.
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knock-down (adj.)
also knockdown, 1680s, from the verbal phrase knock down, attested from mid-15c. in the sense "fell to the ground;" see knock (v.) + down (adv.). As a noun from 1809. Phrase knock-down, drag-out is from 1827.
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rub-down (n.)

also rub-down, "an act of rubbing down," by 1885, from verbal phrase, from rub (v.) + down (adv.).

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