Etymology
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vouch (v.)

early 14c., "summon into court to prove a title," from Anglo-French voucher, Old French vocher "to call, summon, invoke, claim," probably from Gallo-Roman *voticare, metathesis of Latin vocitare "to call to, summon insistently," frequentative of Latin vocare "to call, call upon, summon," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Meaning "guarantee to be true or accurate" is first attested 1590s. Related: Vouched; vouching.

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provocate (v.)

"to provoke, call forth," early 15c., provocaten, rare then and obsolete now, from Latin provocatus, past participle of provocare "to call out" (see provoke). Related: Provocated; provocating.

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cite (v.)

mid-15c., "to summon, call upon officially," from Old French citer "to summon" (14c.), from Latin citare "to summon, urge, call; put in sudden motion, call forward; rouse, excite," frequentative of ciere "to move, set in motion, stir, rouse, call, invite" from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion, to move to and fro."

Sense of "call forth a passage of writing, quote the words of another" is first attested 1530s. Related: Cited; citing.

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appeal (n.)
c. 1300, "proceeding taken to reverse a decision by submitting it to the review of a higher authority," from Old French apel "call, appeal in court" (Modern French appel), back-formation from apeler "call upon" (see appeal (v.)). Meaning "call to an authority" is from 1620s; that of "attractive power" attested by 1904.
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repeal (v.)

late 14c., repēlen, "revoke, rescind, annul; withdraw (a privilege, etc.); repudiate (one's behavior)," from Anglo-French repeler (mid-14c.), Old French rapeler "call back, call in, call after, revoke" (Modern French rappeler), from re- "back" (see re-) + apeler "to call" (later appeler; see appeal (v.)). Related: Repealed; repealing; repealable.

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miscall (v.)

"call by a wrong name, name improperly," mid-15c., from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + call (v.). Related: Miscalled; miscalling.

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convoke (v.)

"to call together, summon to meet," 1590s, from French convoquer (14c.), from Latin convocare "to call together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vocare "to call," a verbal derivative of vox "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Convoked; convoking.

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evocative (adj.)

1650s, "tending to call forth," from Late Latin evocativus "pertaining to summoning," from Latin evocatus, past participle of evocare "call out; rouse, summon," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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op. cit. 

abbreviation of Latin opus citatum "the work quoted;" see opus; citatum is neuter singular past participial of citare "to call, call forward, summon" (see cite).

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cooptation (n.)

also co-optation, 1530s, "choice, selection, mutual choice, election to fill a vacancy" on a committee, board, or society, from Latin cooptationem (nominative cooptatio) "election," noun of action from past-participle stem of cooptare "to elect, to choose as a colleague or member of one's tribe," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + optare "choose" (see option (n.)). Related: Cooptative.

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