Etymology
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wether (n.)
"male sheep," especially a castrated one, Old English weðer "ram," from Proto-Germanic *wethruz (source also of Old Saxon wethar, Old Norse veðr, Old High German widar, German Widder, Gothic wiþrus "lamb"), literally "yearling," from PIE root *wet- (2) "year" (source also of Sanskrit vatsah "calf," Greek etalon "yearling," Latin vitulus "calf," literally "yearling").
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bunt (n.)
1767, "a push with the head or horns" (of a goat or calf); see bunt (v.). Baseball sense "stop the ball with the bat without swinging the bat" is from 1889.
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bullock (n.)
Old English bulluc "young bull, bull calf," from Proto-Germanic *bulluka-, from the stem of bull (n.1). Now always a castrated bull reared for beef.
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quey (n.)

"heifer, young cow that has not had a calf," Scottish and Northern English dialect, late 14c. (c. 1300 in surnames), quie, from Old Norse kviga, apparently from ku "cow" (compare Danish kvie; see cow (n.)).

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clam-digger (n.)

1832, "one who digs clams from rivers and seashores," from clam (n.) + digger. Clam-diggers as a style of women's casual pants hemmed at mid-calf (supposedly resembling styles worn by those digging clams in mud) is by 1995.

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*pere- (1)

*perə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to produce, procure" and yielding and derived words in diverse senses; possibly related to *pere- (2) "to grant, allot."

It forms all or part of: ante-partum; apparatus; apparel; biparous; disparate; emperor; empire; heifer; imperative; imperator; imperial; juniper; multiparous; nulliparous; oviparous; para- (2) "defense, protection against; that which protects from;" Parabellum; parachute; parade; parados; parapet; parasol; pare; parent; -parous; parry; parturient; poor; post-partum; preparation; prepare; primipara; puerperal; rampart; repair (v.1) "to mend, put back in order;" repertory; separate; sever; several; spar (v.); viper; vituperation; viviparous.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit prthukah "child, calf, young of an animal;" Greek poris "calf, bull;" Latin parare "make ready, prepare," parire "produce, bring forth, give birth to;" Czech spratek "brat, urchin, premature calf;" Lithuanian periu, perėti "to brood;" Old High German farro, German Farre "bullock," Old English fearr "bull."

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trumeau (n.)
1883, in architecture, "piece of a wall between two openings," as the central pillar of a great doorway," from French trumeau, literally "calf of the leg" (12c.), from a Germanic source (compare German Trumm "end, stump," Swedish dialectal tromm "stump, end of a log").
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suckling (n.)
mid-15c., "infant at the breast," from suck + diminutive suffix -ling. Similar formation in Middle Dutch sogeling, Dutch zuigeling, German Säugling. Meaning "calf or other young mammal" is from 1520s. Meaning "act of breast-feeding" is attested from 1799. Adjectival sense "not yet weaned" is from 1799.
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rennet (n.1)

"inner membrane in the stomach of an unweaned calf or other animal," used for making cheese, etc.; also the mass of curdled milk found in the stomach, mid-15c., probably from an unrecorded Old English *rynet, related to gerennan "cause to run together," because it makes milk run or curdle; from Proto-Germanic *rannijanan, causative of *renwanan "to run" (from PIE root *rei- "to run, flow"). Compare German rinnen "to run," gerinnen "to curdle." Hence, "anything used to curdle milk."

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bunt (v.)
1825, "to strike with the head or horns" (of a goat or calf); perhaps an alteration of butt (v.) with a goat in mind, or a survival from Middle English bounten "to leap back, return" (early 15c., perhaps from a variant of Old French bondir; see bound (v.2)). As a baseball term from 1889. Also compare punt (v.). Related: Bunted; bunting.
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