Etymology
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byway (n.)
"a private, secluded, or out-of-the-way path or road," mid-14c., from by + way (n.).
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bygone (adj.)
"that has gone by, past," early 15c., from by (adv.) + gone. Compare similar construction of aforesaid. As a noun from 1560s (see bygones).
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bystander (n.)
"spectator, one who stands near," 1610s, from by + agent noun from stand (v.). They have been innocent at least since 1829. Stander-by is from 1540s.
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byline (n.)
also by-line, 1926, "line giving the name of the writer of an article in a newspaper or magazine;" it typically reads BY ________. From by (prep.) + line (n.). As a verb by 1942. Related: Bylined.
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bypass (v.)
1823, "to pass by" (implied in bypassed), from the verbal phrase; see by + pass (v.). From 1928 as "to go round, avoid;" figurative use from 1941. Related: Bypassed; bypassing.
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bye (n.)
in sporting use, a variant of by (prep). Originally in cricket, "a run scored on a ball that is missed by the wicket-keeper" (1746); later, in other sports, "position of one who is left without a competitor when the rest have drawn pairs" (1868).
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bypass (n.)
also by-pass, 1848, "small pipe passing around a valve in a gasworks" (for a pilot light, etc.), from the verbal phrase; see by + pass (v.). First used 1922 for "road for the relief of congestion;" figurative sense is from 1928. The heart operation was first so called 1957.
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byword (n.)
also by-word, late Old English biword "proverb, word or phrase used proverbially;" see by + word (n.). Formed on the model of Latin proverbium or Greek parabole. Meaning "something that has become proverbial" (usually in a satirical or bad sense) is from 1530s.
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whereby (adv.)

"by what, by which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + by.

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bylaw (n.)
also by-law, late 13c., bilage "local ordinance," from Old Norse or Old Danish bi-lagu "town law," from byr "place where people dwell, town, village," from bua "to dwell" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow") + lagu "law" (see law). So, a local law pertaining to local residents, hence "a standing rule of a corporation or association for regulation of its organization and conduct." Sense influenced by by.
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