Etymology
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buttinski (n.)

a jocular name for one who cuts into a line, etc., 1902, American English, from verbal phrase butt in (see butt (v.)) + surname ending based on Eastern European names. Butt-in (n.) "person who butts in" is attested from 1906. Compare Amsterdam.

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butthead (n.)

also butt-head, late 1980s, student slang, "objectionable person," from butt (n.6) + head (n.); perhaps influenced by butterhead, 1960s African-American vernacular for one who is a disgrace to the community. Earlier, butthead meant simply the butt end or bottom of anything (1630s).

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buck (v.3)

1750, "to butt," apparently a corruption of butt (v.) by influence of buck (n.1). Figuratively, of persons, "to resist, oppose," 1857.

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weld (v.)

1590s, "unite or consolidate by hammering or compression, often after softening by heating," alteration of well (v.) "to boil, rise;" influenced by past participle form welled. Related: Welded; welding.

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knub (n.)

"small lump, butt-end or piece," 1560s, probably cognate with Low German knubbe "knot, knob," Danish knub "block, log, stump" (see knob).

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buttery (n.)

"place for storing liquor," also "room where provisions are laid up" (late 14c.), from Old French boterie, from Late Latin botaria, from bota, variant of butta "cask, bottle;" see butt (n.2) + -ery.

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buttocks (n.)

"the two protuberances which form the rump in men and animals," c. 1300, probably from Old English buttuc "end, short piece of land," from Proto-Germanic *butaz, from PIE root *bhau- "to strike," thus related to butt (n.1).

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scuttlebutt (n.)

also scuttle-butt, 1805, "cask of drinking water kept on a ship's deck, having a hole (scuttle) cut in it for a cup or dipper," from scuttle "opening in a ship's deck" (see scuttle (v.2)) + butt (n.2) "barrel." Earlier scuttle cask (1777). The slang meaning "rumor, gossip" is recorded by 1901, traditionally said to be from the sailors' custom of gathering around the scuttlebutt to gossip while at sea. Compare water-cooler, figurative for "workplace gossip" in mid-20c.

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halibut (n.)

large flatfish, early 15c., perhaps from hali "holy" (see holy) + butte "flatfish" (see butt (n.4)). Supposedly so called from its being eaten on holy days (compare cognate Dutch heilbot, Low German heilbutt, Swedish helgeflundra, Danish helleflynder).

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