Etymology
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butt-end (n.)
"thick end," 1580s," from butt (n.1) + end (n.). Meaning "the mere end," without regard to thickness, is from 1590s.
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air-shaft (n.)
long narrow passage for admitting air, 1690s, from air (n.1) + shaft (n.2).
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head-butt (n.)
also headbutt, 1935, from head (n.) + butt (n.5). As a verb, by 1946. Related: Head-butting (1917 as a noun).
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buttinski (n.)
a jocular name for one who cuts into a line, etc., 1902, American English, from verbal phrase butt in (see butt (v.)) + surname ending based on Eastern European names. Butt-in (n.) "person who butts in" is attested from 1906. Compare Amsterdam.
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crankshaft (n.)

also crank-shaft, "shaft turned by a crank," 1803, from crank (v.) + shaft (n.). The basic form of the mechanism appears to date from Roman times.

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butthead (n.)
also butt-head, late 1980s, student slang, "objectionable person," from butt (n.6) + head (n.); perhaps influenced by butterhead, 1960s African-American vernacular for one who is a disgrace to the community. Earlier, butthead meant simply the butt end or bottom of anything (1630s).
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buck (v.3)
1750, "to butt," apparently a corruption of butt (v.) by influence of buck (n.1). Figuratively, of persons, "to resist, oppose," 1857.
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scape (n.2)

in botany, "shaft, stem," c. 1600, from Latin scapus "a stalk, shaft," cognate with Greek skapos "staff," skēptron "staff, scepter" (see scepter).

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ball-bearing (n.)
1874, "method of lessening friction by surrounding a shaft with loose balls;" see ball (n.1) + bearing (n.). They "bear" the friction.
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