Etymology
Advertisement
interment (n.)

"burial, the act of depositing in the ground," early 14c., from Old French enterrement "burial, interment," from enterrer (see inter (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
moat (n.)

c. 1300, mote "a mound, a hill" (a sense now obsolete); late 14c., "ditch or deep trench dug round the rampart of a castle or other fortified place," from Old French mote "mound, hillock, embankment; castle built on a hill" (12c.; Modern French motte) and directly from Medieval Latin mota "mound, fortified height," a word of unknown origin, perhaps from Gaulish mutt, mutta.

The sense shifted in Norman French from the castle mound to the ditch dug around it. For a similar evolution, compare ditch (n.) and dike. As a verb, "to surround with a moat," early 15c. Related: Moated.

Related entries & more 
sepulture (n.)

"burial, interment," early 14c., from Old French sepulture, sepouture "tomb, coffin" (12c.) and directly from Latin sepultura "burial, funeral obsequies," from sepult-, past-participle stem of sepelire "to bury" (see sepulchre). In Middle English it was confused with sepulchre. Related: Sepultural.

Related entries & more 
tombolo (n.)
sand-bar joining an island to the mainland, 1899, from Italian tombolo "sand dune," from Latin tumulus "hillock, mound, heap of earth" (see tomb).
Related entries & more 
tumulous (adj.)
1727, from Latin tumulosus "full of hills," from tumulus "hill, mound, heap of earth" (see tumulus).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ant-hill (n.)
also anthill, "mound of dirt formed by ants in building their nest," late 13c., from ant + hill (n.).
Related entries & more 
mortuary (adj.)

1510s, "of or pertaining to the burial of the dead," from Late Latin mortuarius "of the dead," from Latin mortuus "dead" (see mortuary (n.)).

Related entries & more 
churchyard (n.)

"ground adjoining a church," especially if used for burial, late Old English, from church (n.) + yard (n.1).

Related entries & more 
tell (n.)
"mound, hill," 1864, from Arabic tall, related to Hebrew tel "mount, hill, heap." Compare Hebrew talul "lofty," Akkadian tillu "woman's breast."
Related entries & more 
Sidhe 
"the hills of the fairies," 1793; but in Yeats, "the fairie folk" (1899), ellipsis of Irish (aos) sidhe "people of the faerie mound" (compare second element in banshee).
Related entries & more 

Page 2