Etymology
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bug off (v.)
"leave quickly," by 1956, perhaps from bugger off (see bugger (v.)), which chiefly is British (by 1920s) but was picked up in U.S. Air Force slang in the Korean War. Also see bug (v.3). To bug out "leave quickly, scram" is from 1953.
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buggy (adj.)
"infested with bugs," 1714, from bug (n.) + -y (2).
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firebug (n.)
also fire-bug, "arsonist, incendiary," 1869, from fire (n.) + bug (n.) in the "obsessed person" sense.
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bugbear (n.)
"something that causes terror," especially needless terror, 1580s, a sort of demon in the form of a bear that eats small children, also "object of dread" (whether real or not), from obsolete bug "goblin, scarecrow" (see bug (n.)) + bear (n.).
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boggart (n.)
also boggard, specter, goblin, sprite," especially one supposed to haunt a particular spot, 1560s; see bug (n.).
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litterbug (n.)
1947, from litter + bug (n.). According to Mario Pei ("The Story of Language," Lippincott, 1949) "coined by the New York subways on the analogy of 'jitterbug' ...."
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pillbug (n.)

also pill-bug, kind of wood-louse or other insect-like crustacean which can roll itself into a ball like a pill, 1841, from pill (n.) + bug (n.).

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debug (v.)

"remove the faults from," 1945, of machine systems, from de- + bug (n.) "glitch, defect in a machine." Meaning "to remove a concealed microphone" is from 1964. Related: Debugged; debugging.

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bugaboo (n.)
"something to frighten a child, fancied object of terror," 1843, earlier buggybow (1740), probably an alteration of bugbear (also see bug (n.)), but connected by Chapman ["Dictionary of American Slang"] with Bugibu, demon in the Old French poem "Aliscans" from 1141, which is perhaps of Celtic origin (compare Cornish bucca-boo, from bucca "bogle, goblin").
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jitterbug (n.)
popular type of fast swing dance, 1938, American English, from "Jitter Bug," title of a song recorded by Cab Calloway in 1934. Probably the literal sense is "one who has the jitters" (see jitters; for second element see bug (n.) in the slang "person obsessed with" sense). Another sense current about this time was "swing music enthusiast" (1937). As a verb from 1938.
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