Etymology
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aging (n.)
also ageing, "process of imparting age or the qualities of age to," 1860, verbal noun from age (v.).
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underage (adj.)
also under-age, 1590s, from under + age (n.).
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teenage (adj.)
also teen age, teen-age; 1911, from teen + age (n.). Originally in reference to Sunday School classes. Teen-aged (adj.) is from 1922.
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ageless (adj.)
1650s, "without age," from age (n.) + -less. Related: Agelessly; agelessness.
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aureate (adj.)
early 15c., "resembling gold, gold-colored," also figuratively, "splendid, brilliant," from Latin aureatus "decorated with gold," from aureus "golden," from aurum "gold," from PIE root *aus- (2) "gold" (source also of Sanskrit ayah "metal," Avestan ayo, Latin aes "brass," Old English ar "brass, copper, bronze," Gothic aiz "bronze," Old Lithuanian ausas "gold"), which is probably related to root *aus- (1) "to shine."

Especially of highly ornamented literary or rhetorical styles. Related: Aureation.
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aet. 
"aged (some number of years)," abbreviation of Latin aetatis "of the age of," genitive singular of aetas "age" (see age (n.)). "Chiefly used in classic or scholarly epitaphs or obituaries" [Century Dictionary].
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eld (n.)
"former ages, old times," c. 1400, poetic or archaic form of old; in some cases from Old English eald, yldu, yldo "old age; an age; age as a period of life."
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ormolu (n.)

1765, "an alloy of copper, zinc, and tin resembling gold," from French or moulu, literally "ground gold," from or "gold" (from Latin aurum, from PIE *aus- (2) "gold;" see aureate) + moulu "ground up," past participle of moudre "to grind," from Latin molere "to grind" (from PIE root *mele- "to crush, grind"). The sense of the word before it reached English began as "gold leaf prepared for gilding bronze, brass, etc.," then shifted to "gilded bronze," then to various prepared metallic substances resembling it.

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nonage (n.)

late 14c., "childhood, minority, state of not being of age, period of legal infancy," from Anglo-French nounage (early 14c.), Old French nonaage, from non- (see non-) + age (see age (n.)). Figurative use from 1580s.

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thanage (n.)
c. 1400, from Anglo-French thaynage (c. 1300), from English thane + Old French suffix -age (see -age).
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