Etymology
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middle age (n.)

"period between youth and old age," formerly generally understood as 40 to 50, late 14c., from middle (adj.) + age (n.). The adjective middle-aged "having lived to the middle of the ordinary human lifespan, neither old nor young" is by c. 1600.

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Iron Age 
1590s, originally, as in Greek and Roman mythology, the last and worst age of the world; the archaeological sense of "period in which humans used iron tools and weapons" is from 1866 (earlier in this sense iron period, 1847).
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Minoan (adj.)

"of or pertaining to ancient Crete," 1894, from Minos, famous king of Crete; applied by British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans to the Bronze Age civilization that flourished there c. 3000-1400 B.C.E.

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bell-metal (n.)
"alloy used in making cast bells," 1540s, from bell (n.) + metal (n.). Typically copper and tin, with a higher proportion of tin than usual in bronze.
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gun-metal (n.)
type of bronze or other alloy formerly used in the manufacture of light cannons (since superseded by steel), 1540s, from gun (n.) + metal. Used attributively of a dull blue-gray color since 1905.
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aging (n.)
also ageing, "process of imparting age or the qualities of age to," 1860, verbal noun from age (v.).
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underage (adj.)
also under-age, 1590s, from under + age (n.).
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teenage (adj.)
also teen age, teen-age; 1911, from teen + age (n.). Originally in reference to Sunday School classes. Teen-aged (adj.) is from 1922.
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ageless (adj.)
1650s, "without age," from age (n.) + -less. Related: Agelessly; agelessness.
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