Etymology
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Queensland 

Australian state, founded 1859 and named for Queen Victoria of Great Britain. Related: Queenslander.

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Battenberg (n.)
type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.
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jackaroo (n.)
Australian for "a new arrival from Britain," 1867, from Jack + ending from kangaroo. The female counterpart jillaroo is attested from 1945.
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abolitionist (n.)
person who favors doing away with some law, custom, or institution, 1792, originally in reference to the trans-Atlantic slave trade, from abolition + -ist. By 1825 (in Britain) in reference to abolition of slavery as an institution. In Britain, applied 20c. to advocates of ending capital punishment. In a general sense, abolisher has been used at least since 1742.
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pip-pip 
slangy salutation current in Britain c. 1907-1923, said by Partridge to be in imitation of bicycle horn noise.
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Calor (n.)

proprietary name for a type of liquid gas sold in Britain, 1936, from Latin calor, literally "heat" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm").

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War of 1812 
In reference to the conflict between the U.S. and Great Britain, so called in U.S. by 1815.
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Queensberry Rules 
drawn up 1867 by Sir John Sholto Douglas (1844-1900), 8th Marquis of Queensberry, to govern the sport of boxing in Great Britain.
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bleu 
French form of blue (1), used from c. 1890 in names of various French blue cheeses (French fromage bleu) marketed in Britain and U.S.
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hegemon (n.)

1897, originally with reference to the position of Great Britain in the world, from Greek hēgemon "an authority, leader, sovereign" (see hegemony).

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