Etymology
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import (v.)

early 15c., "signify, show, bear or convey in meaning," from Latin importare "bring in, convey, bring in from abroad," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." In English, the sense of "bring from another state or land," especially "bring in goods from abroad" is recorded by 1540s. As "be important" from 1580s. Related: Imported; importing.

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puerperal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to childbirth; about to give birth," 1768, with -al (1) + Latin puerperus "bringing forth children; bearing a child" (as a noun, "woman in labor"), from puer "child, boy" (see puerility) + parire "to bring forth, bear, produce, create; bring about, accomplish," from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). Earlier puerperial (1620s); puarpure (c. 1500). Related: Puerperally.

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post-partum (adj.)

also postpartum, 1837, "occurring after the birth of a child," from Latin post partum "after birth," from post "after" (see post-) + accusative of partus "a bearing, a bringing forth," from partus, past participle of parire "to bring forth, bear, produce, create; bring about, accomplish" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). Phrase post-partum depression is attested by 1929.

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infer (v.)
in logic, "to 'bring in' as a conclusion of a process of reasoning," 1520s, from Latin inferre "bring into, carry in; deduce, infer, conclude, draw an inference; bring against," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + ferre "to carry, to bear," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry; to bear children." General sense of "draw a conclusion" is first attested 1520s; intransitive sense is from 1570s.
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viviparous (adj.)

1640s, from Late Latin viviparus "bringing forth alive," from Latin vivus "alive, living" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + parire "bring forth, bear" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). See viper.

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aggregate (v.)

c. 1400, "bring together in a sum or mass," from Latin aggregatus, past participle of aggregare "attach, join, include; collect, bring together," literally "bring together in a flock," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather," from grex (genitive gregis) "a flock" (from PIE root *ger- "to gather"). Intransitive meaning "Come together in a sum or mass" is from 1855. Related: Aggregated; aggregating.

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suggestion (n.)
mid-14c., "a prompting to evil," from Anglo-French and Old French suggestioun "hint, temptation," from Latin suggestionem (nominative suggestio) "an addition, intimation, suggestion," noun of action from suggestus, past participle of suggerere "bring up, bring under, lay beneath; furnish, afford, supply; prompt," from sub "under; up from below" (see sub-) + gerere "bring, carry" (see gest). Sense evolution in Latin is from "heap up, build" to "bring forward an idea." Meaning "proposal, statement, declaration" appeared by late 14c., but original English notion of "evil prompting" remains in suggestive. Hypnotism sense is from 1887.
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adduce (v.)
Origin and meaning of adduce

"to bring forward, present, or offer, cite as authority or evidence," early 15c., from Latin adducere "lead to, bring to, bring along," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ducere "to lead," from PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Related: Adduced; adducing.

To allege is to make an unsupported statement regarding something; to adduce, on the other hand, is to bring forward proofs or evidence in support of some statement or proposition already made: as, he alleged that he had been robbed by A. B., but adduced no proof in support of his allegation. [Century Dictionary]
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defeatism (n.)

"conduct tending to bring about acceptance of (the certainty of) defeat" [OED], 1918; see defeatist.

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redact (v.)

late 14c., redacten, "combine in a unity;" c. 1400, "compile, arrange" (laws, codes, etc.); early 15c., "bring into organized form;" from Latin redactus, past participle of redigere "to drive back, force back; bring back; collect, call in; bring down, reduce to a certain state," from red- "back, again" (see re-) + agere "to set in motion, drive, do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").

The specific meaning "arrange, edit, bring into presentable literary form" is from 1851. Also in Middle English "to reduce" (to ashes, powder, etc.), early 15c. Related: Redacted; redacting; redactor; rédacteur.

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