Etymology
Advertisement
write-up (n.)
1882, from the verbal phrase; see write (v.) + up (adv.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
link-up (n.)

"a joining together or coupling," 1945, from the verbal phrase; see link (v.) + up (adv.).

Related entries & more 
mark-up (n.)

also markup, "amount added by a retailer to cover overhead and provide profit," 1899, from the verbal phrase in this sense (by 1870); see mark (v.) + up (adv.).

Related entries & more 
grow up (v.)
"advance toward maturity," 1530s, from grow (v.) + up (adv.). As a command to be sensible, from 1951.
Related entries & more 
hang up (v.)
c. 1300, "suspend (something) so that it is supported only from above;" see hang (v.) + up (adv.); telephone sense by 1911. The noun hang-up "psychological fixation" is first attested 1959, from notion of being suspended in one place.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sign-up (n.)
"number who have signed up," 1926, from the verbal phrase; see sign (v.) + up (adv.).
Related entries & more 
seven-up (n.)
children's game, 1830; with capital initials, as the proprietary name of a brand of carbonated drink, it is attested from 1928.
Related entries & more 
show up (v.)
1826, "to disgrace through exposure," see show (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "to put in an appearance, be present" is from 1888.
Related entries & more 
tune-up (n.)
"adjustments made to an automobile to improve its working," 1911, from verbal phrase tune up "bring to a state of effectiveness," 1718, in reference to musical instruments, from tune (v.) + up (adv.). Attested from 1901 in reference to engines. Meaning "event that serves as practice for a later one" is from 1934, U.S. sports jargon.
Related entries & more 
beef up (v.)
"add strength," 1941, from college slang, from beef (n.) in slang sense of "muscle-power" (1851).
Related entries & more 

Page 2