Etymology
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defraud (v.)

late 14c., defrauden, "deprive of right, by deception or breech of trust or withholding," from Old French defrauder, from Latin defraudare "to defraud, cheat," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + fraudare "to cheat, swindle" (see fraud). Related: Defrauded; defrauding.

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embodiment (n.)

"investment in or manifestation through a physical body; a bringing into or presentation in or through a form," 1824, from embody + -ment.

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reasoning (n.)

late 14c., resouning, "exercise of the power of reason; act or process of thinking logically;" also an instance of this, a presentation of reasons or arguments; verbal noun from reason (v.).

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re-enactor (n.)

1965, agent noun from re-enact (v.). Specifically, "one whose hobby or profession is to embody accurate historical presentation" by 1984, American English.

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re-present (v.)

"to offer again, bring before again," 1560s, from re- "back, again" + present (v.). With hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from represent. Related: Re-presented; re-presenting; re-presentation.

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argumentation (n.)

mid-15c., "presentation of formal arguments," from Old French argumentacion (14c.), from Latin argumentationem (nominative argumentatio) "the bringing forth of a proof," noun of action from past-participle stem of argumentari "adduce proof, draw a conclusion," from argumentum (see argument). The meaning "debate, wrangling, argument back and forth" is from 1530s.

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presentable (adj.)

mid-15c., of a benefice, "capable of being presented or receiving presentation;" also, in law, "liable to formal charge of wrongdoing," from present (v.) + -able. Meaning "suitable in appearance" is from 1800. Related: Presentably; presentability.

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Winchester 

city in Hampshire, capital of Wessex and later of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom, Old English Uintancæstir (c.730), from Ouenta (c. 150), from Venta, a pre-Celtic name perhaps meaning "favored or chief place" + Old English ceaster "Roman town" (see Chester). As the name of a kind of breech-loading repeating rifle it is from the name of Oliver F. Winchester (1810-1880), U.S. manufacturer.

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presentment (n.)

c. 1300, "act of presenting," from Old French presentement "presentation (of a person) at a ceremony" (12c.), from presenter (see present (v.)). From c. 1600 as "anything presented or exhibited." In law, "statement by a grand jury of an offense without a bill of indictment" (mid-15c.).

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display (n.)

1580s, "description," a sense now obsolete, from display (v.). Meaning "exhibition, a spreading of anything to the view," commonly with a suggestion of ostentation or striving for effect, is from 1680s. Meaning "presentation of electronic signals on a screen" is from 1945 in reference to radar, by 1960 of computers. Display-window is attested by 1893.

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