Etymology
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animate (adj.)
"alive," late 14c., from Latin animatus, past participle of animare "give breath to," also "to endow with a particular spirit, to give courage to, enliven," from anima "life, breath" (from PIE root *ane- "to breathe").
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long-winded (adj.)
also longwinded, 1580s, "given to lengthy speeches," from long (adj.) + adjective from wind (n.1) in the secondary Middle English sense "breath in speaking" (early 14c.). "Using much breath," hence "tedious from length."
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exanimate (adj.)

"inanimate, lifeless," 1530s, from Latin exanimatus "lifeless, dead," past participle of exanimare "to deprive of air or breath; tire, fatigue; to deprive of life; to terrify," from ex "out" (see ex-) + animare "give breath to" (see animate (v.)). Related: Exanimation.

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poof (n.1)
sound of a puff of breath or air, 1824, imitative.
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pant (n.)

"a gasping breath, a quick, short effort of breathing," c. 1500, from pant (v.).

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shortness (n.)
Old English scortnes; see short (adj.) + -ness. Shortness of breath is from 1570s.
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pneuma (n.)

a word used in English in various sense from late 19c. ("breath;" "spirit;" "soul;" "a breathing;" also as a technical term), from Greek pneuma "a blowing, a wind, blast; breeze; influence; breathed air, breath; odor, scent; spirit of a person; inspiration, a spirit, ghost," from pnein "to blow, to breathe," from PIE root *pneu- "to breathe," of imitative origin (compare Greek pnoe "breath," pnoia "breathing;" Old English fnora "sneezing," fnæran "to snort").

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windpipe (n.)
"trachea," 1520s, from wind (n.1) in the "breath" sense + pipe (n.1).
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saprostomous (adj.)

"having foul breath," 1889; from Greek sapros "putrid" (see sapro-) + stoma "orifice" (see stoma).

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qi (n.)

in Chinese philosophy, "physical life force," 1850, said to be from Chinese qi "air, breath."

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