Etymology
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breaker (n.)

late 12c., "one who or that which breaks;" 1680s as "heavy ocean wave," agent noun from break (v.). Related: Breakers.

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daybreak (n.)

"dawn, first appearance of light in the morning," 1520s, from day + break (n.).

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law-breaker (n.)

also lawbreaker, mid-15c., from law (n.) + agent noun from break (v.). Old English had lahbreca.

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windbreak (n.)

also wind-break, "row of trees, etc., to break the force of the wind," 1861, American English, from wind (n.1) + break (n.).

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ground-breaking (adj.)

also groundbreaking, 1907 as a figurative adjective, from expression to break ground (1650s), either for planting or for building, which was in figurative use by 1884; see ground (n.) + break (v.).

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windbreaker (n.)

type of jacket to keep off the wind (originally a kind of leather shirt), 1918, from wind (n.1) + agent noun from break (v.).

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breakaway 

also break-away, 1906 (n.), in reference to sports; 1930s (adj.) in reference to splinter groups; from the verbal phrase (attested from 1530s in the sense "disengage oneself abruptly, escape"); see break (v.) + away (adv.).

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heartbreak (n.)

also heart-break, "overwhelming grief or sorrow," 1570s, from heart (n.) + break (n.). Expression break (someone's) heart is from c. 1400. Related: Heartbreaking.

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jaw-breaker (n.)

also jawbreaker 1810, "word hard to pronounce" (jawbreakingly, in reference to pronouncing words, is from 1824), from jaw (n.) + agent noun from break (v.). As a type of hard candy, by 1911.

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breakout (n.)

also break-out, "act of issuing or springing out," 1820, from the verbal phrase, "issue forth, arise, spring up;" see break (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase goes back to Old English ut brecan, utabrecan. Transitive sense is attested from 1610s.

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