Etymology
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vambrace (n.)
armor or guard for the forearm, early 14c., from Anglo-French vant-bras, from Old French avant-bras, from avant "before, in front of" (see avant) + bras "an arm" (see brace (n.)).
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man (v.)
Origin and meaning of man

Middle English mannen, from Old English mannian "to furnish (a fort, ship, etc.) with a company of men," from man (n.). The meaning "take up a designated position on a ship" is attested by 1690s.

The sense of "behave like a man, brace up in a manful way, act with courage" is from c. 1400. To man (something) out "play a man's part, bear oneself stoutly and boldly" is from 1660s. To man up is by 1925 as "supply with a man or men;" by 2006 in the intransitive colloquial sense of "be manly." Related: Manned; manning.

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self-regard (n.)

"consideration for oneself," 1590s, from self- + regard (n.).

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arrogation (n.)

"act of taking more than one's due," 1590s, from Latin arrogationem (nominative arrogatio) "a taking to oneself," noun of action from past-participle stem of arrogare "to claim for oneself" (see arrogate).

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death-wish (n.)

"conscious or unconscious desire for death for oneself or for another," 1896, from death + wish (n.).

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bender (n.)
late 15c., "instrument for bending," agent noun from bend (v.). Slang meaning "drinking bout" is American English, attested from 1846, perhaps from the Scottish sense of "a hard drinker" (1728). Perhaps from the verb in the figurative sense of "strain, brace, wind up." Other slang senses included "a sixpence" (1836) "( ? Because it bends easily.)" [OED]; "a leg" (U.S., 1849).
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stanchion (n.)

early 14c., "post, pillar, or beam used for support," from Old French estanchon "prop, brace, support" (13c., Modern French étançon), probably from estant "upright," from present participle of ester "be upright, stand," from Latin stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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pandiculation (n.)

"an instinctive stretching of oneself, as upon awakening," 1610s, noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin pandiculari "to stretch oneself," from pandere "to stretch" (from nasalized form of PIE root *pete- "to spread"). Sometimes used inaccurately for "a yawning."

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psych (v.)

by 1914 as "to subject to psychoanalysis," short for psychoanalyze. From 1934 as "to outsmart" (also psych out), and by 1952 in bridge as "make a bid meant to deceive an opponent." From 1963 as "to unnerve." However to psych (oneself) up is from 1972; to be psyched up "stimulate (oneself), prepare mentally for a special effort" is attested from 1968.

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bracer (n.)
early 14c., "piece of armor protecting the arm;" 1580s, "a clamp, bind, that which braces or makes firm," agent noun from brace (v.). Figurative sense of "that which braces the nerves" is 1740; especially an alcoholic drink taken early in the morning (by 1826). Related: Bracers.
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