Etymology
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boyhood (n.)

"state of being a boy; the early period of a male's life," 1745, from boy + -hood.

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b'hoy (n.)
1846, U.S. colloquial for "spirited lad, young spark," supposedly from the Irish pronunciation of boy.
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boyish (adj.)
1540s, "pertaining to boys," from boy + -ish. Meaning "puerile" is from 1570s. Related: Boyishly; boyishness.
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fanboy (n.)
"young male enthusiast," by 1988, from fan (n.2) + boy. Fangirl attested from 1989.
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busboy (n.)
also bus-boy, 1913, from bus (v.) in the restaurant sense + boy.
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newsboy (n.)

also news-boy, "boy who hawks newspapers on the street or delivers them to houses," 1764, from news (n.) + boy.

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boyfriend (n.)
also boy-friend, "favorite male companion" (with implication of romantic connection), "a woman's paramour," 1909, from boy + friend (n.). Earlier in a non-romantic sense "juvenile male companion" (1850).
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yob (n.)
"a youth," 1859, British English, back-slang from boy. By 1930s with overtones of "hooligan, lout." Related: extended form yobbo.
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batboy (n.)
also bat-boy, 1910, "youth who has charge of the bats and other equipment of a baseball team," from bat (n.1) + boy.
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schoolboy (n.)

also school-boy, "boy attending school," 1580s, from school (n.1) + boy. As an adjective from 1874. Phrase every schoolboy knows, in reference to basic factual information, is by 1650s (Jeremy Taylor). Related: Schoolboyish.

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