Etymology
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Bow bells (n.)
"born within the sound of Bow Bells" is the traditional (since early 17c.) definition of a Cockney; the reference is to the bells of the church of St. Mary-le-Bow in London's Cheapside district. A church or chapel probably stood there in Anglo-Saxon times, and has been rebuilt many times (it was last destroyed in a 1941 air raid); the bells were noted for their sound from 16c., and a great bell hung there from 1762 to 1941. The church was noted from medieval times for its arches, hence the name, from bow (n.1).
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bowyer (n.)
"maker of bows," attested late 12c. as a surname, from bow (n.1) + -yer.
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bowshot (n.)
also bow-shot, "distance traversed by an arrow in its flight from a bow," c. 1300, from bow (n.1) + shot (n.).
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bowhead (n.)
also bow-head, type of Arctic whale, 1853, from bow (n.1) + head (n.). So called for its shape.
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unbowed (adj.)
late 14c., "not bent," also figuratively "not subdued," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of bow (v.).
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bowman (n.)
"fighting man armed with a bow," late 13c.; as a surname early 13c., from bow (n.1) + man (n.). Bowman's capsule (1882) was named for English surgeon William Bowman (1816-1892).
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bowline (n.)
also bow-line, type of rope on a sailing ship, early 14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), apparently connected with the bow (n.2) of a ship, but attested earlier than that word and not pronounced the same.
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*bheug- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to bend," with derivatives referring to bent, pliable, or curved objects.

It forms all or part of: akimbo; bagel; bight; bog; bow (v.) "to bend the body;" bow (n.1) "weapon for shooting arrows;" bow (n.2) "front of a ship;" bowsprit; buxom; elbow.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit bhujati "bends, thrusts aside;" Old English bugan, German biegen, Gothic biugan "to bend;" Old High German boug, Old English beag "a ring."
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crossbow (n.)

also cross-bow, "missile-throwing weapon consisting of a bow fixed athwart a stock," mid-15c., from cross (n.) + bow (n.1). Unknown to the ancients but common in Europe in the Middle Ages.

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longbow (n.)
also long-bow, the bow of war and chase in medieval Europe and the characteristic weapon of the English soldiery, only gradually superseded by firearms; late 14c., from long (adj.) + bow (n.1). Distinguished from the crossbow, but especially of bows five feet or longer.
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