Etymology
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tie-in (n.)
"connection," 1934, from verbal phrase (attested by 1793), from tie (v.) + in (adv.).
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bow-legged (adj.)
also bowlegged, "having the legs bowed outward," 1550s, from bow (n.1) + legged.
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Bow bells (n.)
"born within the sound of Bow Bells" is the traditional (since early 17c.) definition of a Cockney; the reference is to the bells of the church of St. Mary-le-Bow in London's Cheapside district. A church or chapel probably stood there in Anglo-Saxon times, and has been rebuilt many times (it was last destroyed in a 1941 air raid); the bells were noted for their sound from 16c., and a great bell hung there from 1762 to 1941. The church was noted from medieval times for its arches, hence the name, from bow (n.1).
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bow-wow 
imitative of a dog's barking, first recorded 1570s. Compare Latin baubor, Greek bauzein "to bark," Lithuanian baubti "cry," of cows, etc.
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hog-tie (v.)
also hogtie, "bind hands and feet by crossing and tying them," 1887, from hog (n.) + tie (v.). Related: Hog-tied.
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black-tie (n.)
as an article of male attire, 1848, from black (adj.) + tie (n.). As an adjective, indicating the style of formal attire that features it, or situations where such is the proper dress, by 1933.
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cross-tie (n.)

"transverse connecting piece of lumber," later especially "a railway tie, timber placed under opposite rails for support and to prevent spreading," from cross- + tie (n.).

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bow-window (n.)
"window built so as to project from a wall, curved segmentally," 1753, from bow (n.1) + window.
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Bow Street 
London street near Covent Garden, developed with homes from early 17c., the name (attested from 1680s) is from bow (n.1) in reference to its curved shape. Seat of a metropolitan police court from 1740; hence Bow Street runners, voluntery police force established here in 1750.
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arcuate (adj.)
"bent like a bow," 1620s, from Latin arcuatus "bow-like, arched," past participle of arcuare "to bend like a bow," from arcus "a bow" (see arc (n.)). Related: Arcuration.
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